Missing straddles the realms of disturbing reality and dreams

first_img Twitter Facebook Baritone Clarence Logan, mezzo Rose-Ellen Nichols, and soprano Melody Courage. – PHOTO BY EMILY COOPER READ MORE As a playwright, director, and multimedia artist, Marie Clements is known for her fearless determination to tell Indigenous stories—but even she was hesitant, at first, to explore the new-to-her world of opera while writing about missing and murdered women.“When you’re asked to write on this theme or this reality, sometimes your first response is ‘Oh, I don’t know if I can go in there,’ just because of the gravity of it,” she tells the Straight from Toronto, where her musical documentary, The Road Forward, is screening at the ImagiNATIVE Film & Media Arts Festival.But the story needed to be told, and Clements is not one to back away from a challenge. The result is Missing, her collaboration with Toronto-based composer Brian Current, City Opera Vancouver, and Pacific Opera Victoria, produced in partnership with Vancouver Moving Theatre/DTES Heart of the City Festival. Advertisementcenter_img Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

FOR TIFFS CAMERON BAILEY LOVE OF FILMS INTERSECTS WITH DEVOTION TO FAMILY

first_imgTIFF co-director Cameron Bailey will be honouring Meryl Streep at the festival’s first Tribute Gala event. THE CANADIAN PRESS FILE PHOTO Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: There may not be any plans for Keanu Reeves to attend the Toronto International Film Festival this year, but he is always welcome in the Bailey household.“We watched Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure,” Mr. Film Fest was saying, about the Keanu mission that he and his 10-year-old, Tate, have been on recently.We had arranged to assemble at Soho House for a little rendezvous in the weeks leading up to Cameron Bailey’s biggest of the year, when some 300 movies unspool in Toronto (333 this annum, from all over the world), and he prepares to host well over a hundred celebrities who manifest in this town (including, on the Monday of the fest, at the first ever, seriously star-studded TIFF Tribute Gala) Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

Rashid Shubhankar keep Indian hopes alive

first_imgGurugram: Rashid Khan and Shubhankar Sharma shot contrasting second rounds of two-under-70 and one-over-73, respectively, but both managed to keep Indian hopes alive at the halfway stage of the Indian Open at the DLF Golf & Country Club here on Friday. Two-time Asian Tour winner Khan and two-time European Tour winner Sharma were the best-placed Indians at the end of round two at tied 19th with a tally of two-under-142. The duo trailed the leader Julian Suri of the US by eight shots at the $1.75 million event. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhPGTI member N Thangaraja (71-70) of Sri Lanka returned a two-under-70 to end the day in tied 12th place at three-under-141. He gained 16 places from round one. The cut was declared at two-over-146. Seventy professionals made the cut. Out of a total of 37 Indians, eight made the cut. Khan (72-70) made significant gains in round two as he climbed 27 spots from his overnight tied 46th position after mixing four birdies with two bogeys for a 70. Khan, a winner of two events on the PGTI tour in the last four months, reaped the reward of getting some good practice at the Kalhaar Blues & Greens course in Ahmedabad last week that prepared him well for the daunting challenge at the DLF course. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced laterSharma (69-73) slipped 12 spots on Friday after a sedate 73 that saw him make two birdies and three bogeys. After a consistent first round, Sharma, the 2018 European Tour Rookie of the Year, made a flying start in round two with a birdie on the first. However, his putting let him down thereafter as he dropped bogeys on the fourth and eighth and found it hard to recover subsequently. S Chikkarangappa (70) and Rahil Gangjee (74) were the next best Indians in tied 41st at even-par-144. Ajeetesh Sandhu (71) was a further shot back in tied 53rd. The trio of Gaganjeet Bhullar (74), Gaurav Pratap Singh (73) and two-time Indian Open champion SSP Chawrasia (72) also made it to the weekend as they totalled two-over-146 to be placed tied 61st.last_img read more

Boeing jet trouble leads to cuts at Europes busiest airline

The Associated Press LONDON — Europe’s biggest airline by passengers, budget carrier Ryanair, will cut flights and close some of its bases beginning this winter because of the delay to deliveries of the Boeing 737 Max plane, which has been grounded globally after two fatal crashes.The airline warned Tuesday its growth in European summer traffic for 2020 will be lower than expected because of the slowed deliveries.Ryanair chief Michael O’Leary says the airline “remains committed” to the Boeing 737 Max and expects it to be back in service before the end of the year but that the date is uncertain.He says some delays are expected and that the airline will close some of its bases as a result with a hope to return to “normal” growth levels in 2021.Ryanair, which is Europe’s top airline by passengers, says some delays are expected and doubts about when the plane can return to the skies mean it will take delivery of only 30 Max jets a year from now, rather than the previously scheduled 58.He says the airline will close some of its bases as a result with a hope to return to “normal” growth levels in 2021. No details about the planned base cuts were provided.READ MORE: Ryanair warns Boeing grounding is hurting businessAnalysts at market research firm FXPro note that while Europe’s economy is slowing, there is no lack of demand for flying, so Ryanair’s decision could cause flight tickets to rise somewhat.Boeing’s 737 Max has been grounded after the Lion Air crash off the coast of Indonesia in October and the Ethiopian Airlines crash in March that killed a total of 346 people.Preliminary reports indicate that flight-control software called MCAS pushed the nose of the plane down in both crashes. Chicago-based Boeing did not tell pilots about MCAS until after the first crash. The company is working on changes to make the software more reliable and easier to control.Concerns about the viability of the new aircraft remain, however.The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is due to review Boeing’s fixes and has said it is following a thorough process, but has no timetable for when the recertification will be completed.European regulators have to then also approve the jets before they can be used in the region.American Airlines said this week that it will keep the Boeing 737 Max plane off its schedule until Nov. 3, which is two months longer than it had planned. That will result in the cancellation of about 115 flights per day.United Airlines has also extended its cancellations until Nov. 3. The company has 14 Max jets while American has 24 of them. Southwest Airlines, which has 34 Max jets, more than any other carrier, is cancelling about 150 flights per day. read more

Somali President cites successes in rebuilding country urges support in fight against

Recalling the major milestones Somalia achieved over the past year, the country’s President today told the United Nations that bolstering its political and governance gains requires international support, particularly the ongoing struggle to drive out armed groups such as Al-Shabaab, which continue to menace the Horn of Africa.“Somalia would not have ended the transition last year without the help of the United Nations and all other countries that stood with us during difficult times,” Hassan Sheikh Mohamud told the General Assembly, while making it clear that the “difficult times” are far from over, with Al-Qaida and its offshoots such Al-Shabaab still wreaking havoc across the region.In that context, he strongly condemned the “cruel and terrible attack” on Westgate shopping mall last weekend in Nairobi, Kenya. Al-Shabaab has claimed responsibility for the attack, proving that the armed group is “down” but not out. They must be combated on many fronts: military, economic, political and ideological. “We now need the tools to finish the job and we call on our friends to remain resolute and help us to end this situation. Our brave Somali forces, AMISOM (African Union Mission in Somalia), and Ethiopia, need help to fight our enemies,” Mr. Mohamud declared, adding specifically that AMISOM must be reinforced and expanded. “Little investment is required for these enhancements, [indeed it will be] insignificant compared to the great expense that will be needed later if the international community does not help finish the job,” he said, urging comprehensive action while at the same time cautioning against “overreacting to or underestimating” the threat.Mr. Mohamud went on to draw the Assembly’s attention to the “New Deal” agreed for Somalia earlier this month at an international conference in Brussels. It aims to drive the country’s economic and political recovery and lay a strong foundation for building reliable, transparent, accountable and functioning State institutions, respectful of the fundamental rights and freedoms and equality of Somalia’s citizens.“We need to transform the lives of our people, reconnect with our citizens and enhance their wellbeing,” he said, acknowledging that the programme will have to show tangible results on the ground. In the meantime, the Government started a campaign to revitalize service delivery in districts and regions, provide healthcare, and enable access to clean water, among other positive initiatives. Mr. Mohamud welcomed the recently-deployed UN Mission Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM), and said the operation is now working together with the Government to bring peace and stability to the country. The President is one of scores of leaders to speak at the annual General Assembly session at which heads of State and Government and other high-level officials will present their views and comments on issues of individual national and international relevance. read more

Brock partners with Niagara chambers for landmark skills survey

Brock University is partnering with the Greater Niagara Chamber of Commerce (GNCC) and South Niagara Chambers of Commerce (SNCC) on a survey to better understand how the talent and skills capacity of the region lines up with the needs of employers.The Chamber of Commerce Survey is now open on the Brock University website and includes questionnaires for both business owners and employees. The goal is to identify the types of programs and supports needed to serve employers, as well as employees looking to upgrade their skills and advance their careers in Niagara.“Good business depends on good data. Without solid information, any organization is working in the dark,” says Mishka Balsom, President and CEO of the Greater Niagara Chamber of Commerce. “In Niagara, we need to identify the professional development needs of our labour force so that educational programs can be aligned to support the required talent and skills pool.”Dolores Fabiano, Executive Director of the South Niagara Chambers of Commerce, said business owners who make up the various chambers of commerce across the region are looking forward to what the survey might reveal.“With labour shortage being one of the biggest issues facing our businesses in Niagara, we believe the data gathered through this unique partnership will provide us with valuable information that will guide us to action,” she said.The survey takes five to 10 minutes to complete and is confidential. Only aggregate data will be used in reports on the survey’s findings.“Brock University is pleased to partner with the GNCC and SNCC in launching this important study to better understand the skills and talent capacity and needs of Niagara,” Brock President Gervan Fearon said. “With the data collected from this survey, together we can help build a more prosperous future and support careers and businesses here in Niagara for generations to come.”In addition to being available online at brocku.ca/community-engagement/chamber-survey business owners and employees will have the opportunity to complete the survey at various events across the region throughout the spring. read more

Modern dewatering technologies demanded for fine iron ore applications

first_imgThe large quantities of low grade iron ore around the world are forcing the industry to upgrade for the steel producers. This requires more benefication and there is a tendency towards finer grinding. Thus reliable dewatering solutions are demanded, but at the same time they should require low capital investment as well as low operation cost, Outotec points out. Demand for iron ore has increased dramatically in the last years and is forecast to remain at stable high production levels for years to come. It is expected that the world economy is facing a stable continuous growth of iron ore to 2,000 Mt and more over the next decades. Furthermore it is expected that the existing and known high grade ore resources will decline, and the iron ore industry will be forced to implement more and more advanced beneficiation plants. As a consequence of the more complex benefication requirements, there will be a need for modern solutions for iron ore dewatering that are reliable mechanically as well as cost effective and with high capacity per unit at the same time.From the CAPEX point of view, the ranking between pressure filtration and vacuum filtration is clearly in favour of vacuum filtration. Only for finer and highly contaminated products do the product recoveries of pressure filters justify the higher investment costs.With respect to vacuum filtration technology, a distinction between horizontal and vertical vacuum filtration equipment can be made. Vacuum belt filters like RB-SV should be considered for heavy material in the coarser grinding range. In the wide range between heavy coarse and very fine material, use of Ceramec and RVDF technologies predominate.In addition to the well known and commonly used vacuum disc filters, a reliable and low operating cost filtration solution with a large filtration area for high capacity and stable product moisture content has been developed and will be steadily improved according to process demands. This filter is called the Outotec Larox CC, Ceramec capillary action filter, which guarantees stable capacity and good moisture results with low capital investment and operation costs and easy maintenance and monitoring.The Larox CC filter also has other remarkable advantages, because it is a plug and produce solution including features such as a small installed vacuum pump, easy online monitoring and continuous steady product characteristics. The automation features of this technology allow completely independent cake forming and drying control. The low vacuum pump requirements reduce the investment costs, because all the required features are mounted on the filter rig itself and no additional cabling work and transformers are needed.The effective and reliable construction enables easy maintenance and provides the lowest operating costs, because no cloth changing is needed and the ceramic plates last for years. Conventional vacuum filtration methods have been the most prevalent in fine iron ore dewatering. Product quality needs, lower ore grades, complex mineralogy and energy costs have resulted in iron ore producers seeking better solutions for dewatering, in particular pelletizing feed. New advanced filtration methods have been introduced to the market.A paper Experiences with modern dewatering technologies in Fine Iron Ore application describes how these modern methods are answering the needs of the industry. Performance of advanced dewatering technologies (pressure filtration and ceramic capillary action filtration) for iron ore applications have been studied, and the findings are based on both industrial and pilot scale experiences on different materials. For example, the results show that the cake moisture content of iron ore pelletising feed can be optimised more effectively by using modern filtration technologies. By selecting the most suitable and adjustable equipment, the effects of variations of feed material on down stream processes can be minimised and the possibilities of processing more difficult raw materials to high quality pellets are better.Outotec innovates, develops and delivers sustainable technology and service solutions to minerals, metals, chemical and energy industries. Outotec collaborates lifelong with its customers in order to optimize the utilization of raw materials and energy efficiency as well as to minimize the environmental impact and operating costs. Outotec develops, designs and manufactures industrial Larox filters and is a leading technology company in its field and is a full service solution provider in filtration for separating solids from liquids. As such, this paper compares the new developments in this market area with the prevailing known vacuum filtration technology, but focuses on a comparison between capillary action filters and rotary vacuum disc filters (RVDF). The product name name Larox CC is used to differentiate the Outotec Larox filters from the generic term.last_img read more

RK Gorenje and RK Celje PL postpone title decision for May 27

RK Celje PLRK GorenjeSlovenian handball Final decision about the name of Slovenian champions is postponed for May 27. Two best teams, RK Gorenje and RK Celje Pivovarna Laško played 27:27 (10:17) in front of 2.000 fans in Velenje’s “Rdeča dvorana”. The home team had a chance to almost secure trophy with a victory, but Marko Šibila guys were seven goals behind the rivals from Celje at the half-time break.However, Gorenje managed to come back untl 55th minute (25:25). Celje PL had last attack for a win, but at the end, teams stayed equal and ready for decisive clash on May 27 at “Zlatorog” hall in Celje.RK Gorenje Velenje : RK Celje Pivovarna Laško   26:26 (10:17)RK Gorenje Velenje: Burič B. 11/1 saves, Zaponšek 2/1 saves; Cehte 6, Medved 3/1, Burič S. 1, Ovniček, Levc, Szyba, Skube 4, Golčar, Šoštarič 4, Kleč 5, Gams, Ratajec 1, Nosan 2, trener: Marko ŠibilaRK Celje Pivovarna Laško: Lesjak 14/3 saves, Gajič; Blagotinšek 3, Malus 4, Babarskas 1, Janc 4, Razgor, Marguč, Grošelj, Poteko, Suholežnik, Zarabec 5, Kodrin 2/2, Fižuleto, Mlakar 7, Žvižej; trener Branko TamšeKoper 2013 : Maribor Branik 28:26 (14:13)Urbanscape Loka – Riko RibnicaStandings:Gorenje Velenje        5   – 58Celje Pivovarna Laško  5  – 57Maribor Branik         5  – 39Riko Ribnica           4  – 36Koper 2013             5 – 35Urbanscape Loka        4  – 30 ← Previous Story All Star team of Norwegian league 2015/2016 Next Story → DKB BUNDESLIGA: Dario Quenstedt stops Kiel in Magdeburg read more

Frozen in time Incredible video shows womans house untouched for 14 years

first_imghttp://vimeo.com/88597387(Vimeo: Donal Moloney)WHILE ON A shoot in rural Ireland recently, professional photographer Donal Moloney was told about an interesting site nearby.On the advice of a local, he visited an old building once owned by a librarian.Birdie Higgins had moved out of her house about 14 years ago to take up residence in a retirement home. Her original property was never lived in again.“Time almost seems to have stood still since her leaving and me arriving,” explained Moloney.Signs of her life can be seen throughout his images – open packages of soup, a newspaper on the sidetable, a cardigan draped across a chair and abandoned slippers in front of the fire.There are also hints to her job, with English Literature books open on a table.Birdie died three years ago, aged 94.A prayer for those who live aloneMoloney, who has a specific interest using abandoned and derelict buildings in his work, toldTheJournal.ie that he spent three hours exploring Birdie’s house.“I am used to walking around these old and decayed places but this house was different. I was touched by various things – the Milk of Magnesia, the prunes which were found in every old person’s home. But there is a shot of a clock and Holy Water from Knock…beside them is a little frame for a prayer for those who live alone.“That got me. I welled up. It was the most touching moment in the house.“But the whole thing was amazing. The beauty, decay and colour.”last_img read more

Suspects who stole baby dinosaur from a museum hand themselves in

first_imgTWO SUSPECTS WHO allegedly stole a model of a baby dinosaur from a museum in the United States have turned themselves in to police.The theft took place on Monday when the replica, which is valued at $10,000 (€7,500), was taken from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science.The polymer resin model of an edmontosaurus hatchling was about 12 to 14 inches long.A number of props were also taken from a history exhibit in a nearby museum, including fake cabbage, lettuce, doilies, and an antique medicine bottle.In a statement, the museum said that the dinosaur replica had been recovered. A man was seen dropping a bag near the back entrance of the museum on Wednesday evening after closing time. The man left the scene before security arrived, but the bag was found to contain the dinosaur replica.The two suspects voluntarily turned themselves in the following morning.Logan Todd Ritchey, 21, and Alyssa Ann Lavacca, also 21, have both been charged with two counts of theft or destruction of property.“I doubt these two individuals realised the seriousness of tampering with artifacts and exhibits in a public museum,” police spokesperson Glen Allen said.MORE IN SCIENCE: Read: Newly-discovered dinosaur was the T Rex of its day > Read: You can finally have the pet dinosaur you’ve always wanted >last_img read more

Google selling Nexus 7 at a loss not cost

first_imgGoogle’s Nexus 7 tablet wasn’t exactly a well-kept secret, but they still rocked the tablet world when they revealed it at Google I/O 2012. One of the more surprising revelations: when Android chief Andy Rubin later revealed that Google was selling the tablets at cost.Now, a teardown report has confirmed that… sort of. UBM Tech Insights’ analysis pegs the 8GB Nexus 7 tablet’s bill of materials at around $184. That’s $15 shy of the selling price, of course, but that doesn’t take into account several other costs.There’s that $25 Google Play credit for one thing, though that’s probably being written down as a marketing cost — the same goes for the digital copy of Transformers: Dark of the Moon. Google is also shipping the Nexus  for free $14 in the United States. When you add in R&D costs, it’s hard to imagine that $15 would cover everything.That doesn’t matter to Google. The Nexus 7’s mission is to advance the Google Play store and boost mindshare with consumers. It’s still a distant second to Apple’s store right now, and Google’s OK with offering up a loss leader in order to close the gap.They may also be hoping that shoppers will opt for the 16GB model, too — a good possibility since the Nexus 7 doesn’t feature a miscroSD expansion slot. The $50 premium for the bump from 8GB to 16GB more than covers the cost of a little extra NAND. Most industry estimates peg that at around $7-8, so it certainly seems like Google stands to pocket a few dollars’ profit when Nexus buyers opt for the increased storage.More at Fudzilla and UBM Tech Insightslast_img read more

Former Chelsea player suffers racial abuse

first_imgFormer Newcastle and Chelsea player Demba Ba is a recent victim of racial abuse. The ugly incident occurred during their Chinese Super League game.Shenhua coach Wu Jingui told reporters that a Changchun Yatai player (midfielder Zhang Li) used racially insulting language toward Demba Ba during an altercation late in a match on Saturday, which ended in a 1-1 draw.The fiasco generated controversy on the Chinese internet, with fans calling for immediate action on the culprit.“The Chinese Super League has players of many different skin colors. We should respect our opponents, and there should be no discrimination,’ Wu said after the match. ‘I cannot calm down now. I feel great regret about the lack of respect for a player.”Shenhua has not disclosed details of the incident, but Xu Jiang, a prominent Chinese sports blogger, wrote on social media that Zhang allegedly shouted ‘You black’ repeatedly at Ba.Demba Ba is offended by racism wordings from Changchun Yatai player Zhang Li. CFA should take serious disciplinary actions!! #saynotoracism pic.twitter.com/xqGJ54LWrwTammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.— Shanghai Shenhua FC (@shanghaishenhua) August 4, 2018The two players were involved in a spat in the 77th minute after Ba clashed with a Changchun player challenging for a header. Ba exchanged words with Zhang in a running dispute and reacted furiously minutes later before the two were broken up by teammates and technical staff.The Senegalese international is currently on his second spell with the Chinese side, having re-signed in June.Ba took the Chinese league by storm during his first spell with Shanghai in 2015 and 2016 before suffering a serious leg fracture.last_img read more

Alba does think Messis absence affects Barcelona

first_imgAhead of Barcelona’s match against Internazionale Milano, left-back Jordi Alba spoke about Lionel Messi’s absence and Julen Lopetegui’s situation.The third Champions League match for FC Barcelona will start on Wednesday and players like Jordi Alba are making the rounds with the press, he spoke about Lionel Messi’s absence and Julen Lopetegui’s situation with Real Madrid.Alba developed a great relationship with the current Los Blancos manager, he also is one of the most connected players to Lionel Messi’s style of play and this makes him one of the most obvious people to talk about the two figures.This Tuesday he gave a press conference in which he was questioned about both subjects, Messi’s absence against Inter and the possibility of Julen Lopetegui getting sacked by Real Madrid’s board of directors after El Clasico next Sunday.🎙 @JordiAlba: “Leo is a big loss. We all play better with him on the field. We’ll have to bring out our best and we’re quite capable of doing that” #BarçaInter pic.twitter.com/Ir3y6mKUJa— FC Barcelona (@FCBarcelona) October 23, 2018“Replacing Leo is impossible for any player regardless of how good he is. He makes every other player be better and he also scores a lot of goals,” said Alba to Diario AS. “Sometimes, Leo takes the ball and he solves a match for us. Now it’s time for all of us to get the job done, we have to grind our teeth and win in any way we can. Sometimes we have to wait until Messi can solve these types of matches.”“Messi’s absence affects me a lot to be honest, I play my best football around him. He sometimes can see a pass that none of us can, he is different from the rest. He can see me moving to get that last pass.”“We always try to look for each other during the match and that makes me feel stronger. His absence will be very important but we will see.”“Either we are dependant on Messi or not… the truth is that we are a better squad with him and it will cost us a lot more to win matches but we have other great players,” said Alba.🎙 @JordiAlba : “Inter are a great team and they’re having a good season. We hope to win with the fans right behind us” #BarçaInter pic.twitter.com/fOJKYUDaVPFati and Suarez shine against Valencia at Camp Nou Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 15, 2019 With a mesmerizing first half from Ansu Fati and a brace from Luis Suarez in the second half, Barcelona demolished Valencia at Camp Nou.Valencia…— FC Barcelona (@FCBarcelona) October 23, 2018Alba also spoke about Julen Lopetegui’s decision to leave Spain and play for Real Madrid, about the possibility of getting sacked after making that choice.“Everybody makes decisions, Julen’s intention was to finish the World Cup and then go to Real Madrid. Then there was another decision made by the FEF president and the manager as well.”“I have a fantastic relationship with him and he helped me on a personal level when things weren’t working for me. I wish he can keep his job at Real Madrid.”“The fact that he went to that specific club was something I didn’t like, but I hope he can stay there for a long time. He deserves to stay because he is a great professional.”He could be good enough for Barcelona but I’m happy with our manager right now. Apart from doing a great work with all the players, he speaks directly with each and every one of them,” he concluded.🆚 Viktoria Plzen❓ Mood in the camp👊 Fighting spiritRead what Lopetegui said in his pre-match press conference. 👇https://t.co/4S51MXJ0z0— Real Madrid C.F. 🇬🇧🇺🇸 (@realmadriden) October 22, 2018last_img read more

Mountain View wins 3A GSHL football title

first_imgThose were real, those things falling down Nicholas Wright’s face Friday night after he played the football game of his life for the Mountain View Thunder.“Tears of pain and joy,” Wright said.The pain will go away, but the joy just might last forever.Wright rushed for 269 yards and four touchdowns, leading the Thunder to a 34-28 victory over Columbia River to win the Class 3A Greater St. Helens League championship at Kiggins Bowl.“I’ve only dreamed about it,” Wright said of a game like this one.“I wanted it for the guys. We didn’t get it last year,” Wright said of the title. “We got it this year. I pushed my hardest to get us there.”Mountain View completed the regular season with a 5-0 mark in league, 7-2 overall, heading into the state preliminary round. The Thunder will host a playoff game in Week 10.Columbia River (7-2, 4-1 GSHL) missed out on its opportunity to win a second consecutive league title, but only after threatening the Thunder with a serious fourth-quarter comeback. The Chieftains will be on the road for the Week 10 playoff game.last_img read more

Apple chipmaker Dialog lands at low end of sales target amid iPhone

first_imgDialog Semiconductor, which makes chips for iPhones, posted its preliminary revenue for the fourth quarter of 2018 on Monday. Angela Lang/CNET Dialog Semiconductor reported on Monday that its quarterly sales projection would be at the low end of its target. The German chipmaker, which relies on Apple for about 75 percent of its revenue, said its preliminary revenue for the fourth quarter of 2018 was around $431 million. That compares with the guidance range of $430 million to $470 million given in October. The news comes less than two weeks after Apple posted a sales warning to investors regarding holiday sales. We’ve also seen  hints that its 2018 models (the iPhone XS, the XS Max and the XR) would be subject to production cuts and slashed prices in China. iPhone XS, XS Max and XR: 27 tips and tricks to master Apple’s latest phones See All $999 Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Apple crashes CES and the latest 2019 iPhone leak 16:39 $999 See it Phones Tech Industry Stock Market Apple reading • Apple chipmaker Dialog lands at low end of sales target amid iPhone slump $999 Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Apple iPhone XS Boost Mobile Dialog’s shares initially dropped with the projection’s release, but then climbed in German trading, the Financial Times reported. The company was recently up 2.5 percent, cutting its 12-month loss to roughly 10 percent, the paper noted. Neither Dialog nor Apple immediately responded to requests for comment. In October, Apple made a deal to buy part of Dialog — whose processors have been used in iPhones since the first model in 2007 — for $600 million, with the deal expected to close in the first half of 2019. A rumor that Apple would start making its own power management chips caused Dialog’s shares to tumble 18 percent back in 2017. center_img See It Sprint Target Apple Tags Best Buy See It See It Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 28 Photos 1 Comment Apple testifies in court: It says Qualcomm’s hardball tactics squeezed Intel chips out of iPad Mini 2.Apple to build $1B Austin campus: It’s looking to add thousands of jobs in a big US expansion. Share your voice Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? • Now playing: Watch this: CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $999last_img read more

Commission Recommends Boost In CoastWide Halibut Catch

first_imgThe International Pacific Halibut Commission Friday voted to recommend a 1.7-million pound increase in the coast-wide catch of halibut.The joint U.S. and Canadian body oversees management of the highly prized bottom fish from California to Alaska. The commission held its annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia this week.The IPHC voted for a coast-wide catch for combined for commercial and charter fisheries of 29.223 million pounds, up from last year’s 27.515 million pounds.Commissioner Jim Balsiger of Alaska noted wider participation at this year’s meeting. “I found it refreshing is the right word, but it’s certainly a change in direction that we had other sectors than the directed halibut users in the room,” Balsiger said. “I think it’s the only way we can make progress on what has been the major issue, major point of contention between Canada and the U.S. up here, is the other users of halibut that have not been in the room before. They were here full force. I think that’s a great step forward.”The commission heard presentations on the issue of halibut bycatch, or fish caught in other fisheries by boats targeting other species. That included input from Bering Sea trawl fleet representatives and others on efforts to reduce bycatch. The additional halibut removal increased coast-wide last year, to over nine million pounds, with over six million pounds of that coming from western Alaska and the Bering Sea. Halibut are caught in trawl nets by boats fishing for sole and hook and line boats fishing for Pacific cod.Commissioner David Boyes of Canada said the bycatch issue was important for the entire coast. “Juveniles from the Bering Sea migrate very extensively. They populate all areas of the coast right down to the southern most part of the range of this species. And so everybody has a vital interest in getting bycatch down to the lowest level that’s practicable, as it says in the Magnuson Stevens Act.”The Commission plans to meet with the North Pacific Fishery Management Council on the issue February 5th. That council is scheduled to take action on recommendations for bycatch limit reduction measures this June. Those measures could be in place for 2016.National Marine Fisheries Service assistant administrator for fisheries Eileen Sobeck wrote to the commission seeking a higher catch limit for the longline fleet in the Bering Sea. She highlighted the importance of the directed fishery to residents and businesses, along with efforts to reduce bycatch by other fishing fleets. The commission voted to recommend the same level for area 4, the Bering Sea and Aleutian islands, as last year.For Southeast area 2C, the commission approved a combined commercial and charter catch of 4.65 million pounds. That’s an increase from last year’s limit of almost half a million pounds.For the central Gulf, area 3A, the commission recommended a combined commercial and charter limit of 10.1 pounds. That’s also an increase from last year, of over 600-thousand pounds.The Commission also adopted catch-share plans for Southeast Alaska and the central Gulf that impact the number and size of halibut that charter anglers can keep.Area 2B, British Columbia, was approved for just over seven million pounds, also an increase from last year’s catch.Commissioners approved a season start date of March 14th and end date of November 7th. Balsiger of Alaska was appointed chair for the next two years. The commission’s next annual meeting is in Juneau a year from now.last_img read more

Development of Artificial Intelligence to Aid Radiology

first_imgVideos | Artificial Intelligence | December 08, 2016 Development of Artificial Intelligence to Aid Radiology Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence to Aid Radiology – RSNA 2016Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:03Loaded: 2.06%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:03 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Recent Videos View all 606 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Technology Reports View all 9 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Information Technology View all 220 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Mark Michalski, M.D., director of the Center for Clinical Data Science at Massachusetts General Hospital, explains the basis of the utilization of artificial intelligence (aka deep learning and machine learning) in radiology. He also explains where things are at in development of these neuro networks at RSNA 2016. Watch the VIDEO “Examples of Artificial Intelligence in Medical Imaging Diagnostics.”  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting.last_img read more

by Victoria Ahearn The Canadian Press Posted

first_img by Victoria Ahearn, The Canadian Press Posted Dec 26, 2017 5:00 am PDT Last Updated Dec 26, 2017 at 5:40 am PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Indigenous filmmaking set to rise in Canada in 2018 and beyond TORONTO – Indigenous filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin never thought she would see this in her lifetime.Fifty years after starting her distinguished career amid major funding roadblocks, the Quebec-raised 85-year-old is elated to see Indigenous filmmaking finally at an “exciting” place heading into 2018, with new initiatives including an Indigenous Screen Office in Canada.“Any Indigenous person who wants to make a film … if ever there was a possible time — this is it,” the acclaimed Abenaki documentary maker says from Montreal, where she’s editing her 51st feature-length project.“I feel that we’re really going someplace where we’ve never gone before. I know that Canadians are really listening now and want to know the truth.”After decades of misrepresentation and under-representation of Indigenous culture in Canada’s screen industry, the community is experiencing a boost.One of the biggest game-changers is the Indigenous Screen Office, a collaboration between the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, the CBC, the Canada Media Fund, Telefilm Canada, the Canadian Media Producers Association, and the National Film Board of Canada.Announced in June, the office aims to develop a long-term strategy to help support the development, production and marketing of content in the Canadian Indigenous screen-based industry.“I think that’s a huge, huge step forward for Canada and something that’s been needed, and something that’s been advocated for, for many years,” says Jesse Wente, Toronto-based Indigenous activist and film critic who recently curated the CBC Arts series “Keep Calm And Decolonize.”“I think the screen office will help facilitate development of Indigenous talent to be able to take on those projects, a development of stories from an Indigenous perspective, and Indigenous-led crews and viewpoints that I think … has been tough for the industry and the community to always navigate.”Wente hopes the office will be similar to Screen Australia’s Indigenous department and create projects in an authentic way “that has a deeply involved community and nurtures Indigenous talent to grow as filmmakers to where they’re at a really high level of production and skill.”“The hope is that we’ll get to a point with the screen office where it’s Indigenous people who are greenlighting Indigenous-led projects, which currently does not exist and has never existed, at places like Telefilm or the CMF,” says Jason Ryle, artistic director of the imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival.“We’re looking for this work; there’s an audience for this work.”Meanwhile, the NFB is working on a three-year plan to “redefine its relationship with Indigenous Peoples.”Announced in June, the plan includes immediately ensuring that 15 per cent of production spending is on Indigenous-directed projects.“It’s been a conversation that’s been going on for a very long time but now there’s actual momentum, and organizations like the film board are making commitments and the conversation is shifting,” says Michelle van Beusekom, executive director of programming and production in the NFB’s English Program.The past year also saw a spotlight on Indigenous filmmaking during various celebrations for Canada’s 150th birthday, and Telefilm vowed to provide increased support for Indigenous filmmakers.“It does look very bright,” says Ryle.“We’ve never been in this position before. The conversations we’re having now, even a year ago they were very different; two years ago, they were completely different.”One of the biggest drivers of such change has been the recommendations and awareness from Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on residential schools, say many.Accessible filmmaking tools like smartphones, and streaming services like Netflix, are also democratizing the system.Such stories are being told in many different forms — from short films to fiction features and virtual reality — and in a variety of languages and genres.Among the homegrown Indigenous films on the horizon is “Indian Horse,” which is based on Richard Wagamese’s novel about a residential school survivor. Clint Eastwood is executive producer of the drama, which is full of Indigenous talent and is slated to hit theatres April 13.“Angelique’s Isle” by Michelle Derosier and Marie-Helene Cousineau is based on a novella by James R. Stevens and is set during the copper rush of 1845. It’s also expected to be released next year.And the short “Nuuca” by Michelle Latimer, about the oil boom in North Dakota, will have its international premiere at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.Other Indigenous filmmakers making waves in Canada these days include Marie Clements, Danis Goulet, Lisa Jackson, and Shane Belcourt — to name but a few.“It’s exciting to see all these new opportunities arise and then movies like this that put native people first,” says Ojibwe “Indian Horse” star Ajuawak Kapashesit, who was born in Moose Factory, Ont“It gives an opportunity for a native student to walk into a theatre and see somebody that looks like them on the big screen — not just as background, not just as an extra or something, but as an actual, full-fledged character, as a lead character.“That’s something that I think is important for kids to see if they want to potentially go down that road in the future and say, ‘Hey, this is something we can actually do.’”And it’s not just traditional community-based, issues-driven stories being created.Wente says some filmmakers are looking to futuristic and fantasy stories.“I think you’re really seeing a lot of Indigenous futurism … a lot of post-apocalyptic ideas, a lot of notions around what an Indigenous future would look like,” says Wente.Adds Ryle: “I think that speaks to the real health and vibrancy not just of the industry but I think of Indigenous communities themselves.“If one can dream an Indigenous future, regardless of what shape that takes, I think that speaks really strongly of where those people are in the present.”Such visionaries include Jeff Barnaby, who grew up on the Mi’gmaq reserve in Listuguj, Que. He’s currently working on “Blood Quantum,” a zombie movie set outside the isolated Mi’gMaq reserve of Red Crow.“His sensibility is entirely contemporary,” says Wente. “He’s a director as steeped in Indigenous cinema as he is in ‘Blade Runner’ and George A. Romero.“I think that very much is the contemporary Indigenous filmmaker, and I think there’s lots of folks that could be directing a horror movie in the next 10 years from our community.”Wente and Ryle also point to Taika Waititi, the Indigenous filmmaker from New Zealand behind the 2017 superhero hit “Thor: Ragnarok.”“The success of ‘Thor: Ragnarok,’ that’s been such a profound thing and I think there’s a lot of excitement and momentum to see what happens with his career and where he goes to next,” says Ryle.For Obomsawin, all of this is a stark contrast to the start of her career, when she had an “awful” time trying to get funding for documentaries including “Mother of Many Children” and “Incident at Restigouche.”“I think it’s easier now,” she says. “There’s more money available at a lot of the institutions for Indigenous people to do their work, whether it’s in film or as an artist, painters, writers.“It’s like a bomb everywhere — it’s so exciting.”last_img read more

Increased security closed roads during Israeli presidents visit

first_imgDue to an official visit to Cyprus by Israeli President Reuven Rivlin on Tuesday there will be increased security measures, police announced.During the day, roads in both Larnaca and Nicosia will be closed to traffic for short periods of time. For security reasons, exact details will not be announced.The public is urged to be patient and follow instructions of police officers.Bilateral relations, the Cyprus problem and regional issues are expected to be discussed during talks between Rivlin and President Nicos Anastasiades in Nicosia.After their talks, the two presidents will make statements to the press. Later, Anastasiades will host an official lunch for Rivlin and his delegation.Rivlin is also expected to visit a monument in Nicosia dedicated to the 2,200 children of Holocaust survivors who were born in British detention camps in Cyprus in the aftermath of World War II, in the late 1940s. The monument is situated at the present military camp of Lieutenant General Vasilios Kapotas, known as BMH (British Military Hospital).You May LikePlarium I Vikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedPlarium I Vikings: Free Online GameUndoLivestlyChip And Joanna’s $18M Mansion Is Perfect, But It’s The Backyard Everyone Is Talking AboutLivestlyUndoYahoo SearchYou’ve Never Seen Luxury Like This On A Cruise Ship. Search Luxury Mediterranean CruisesYahoo SearchUndo Pensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoCruise passenger airlifted to Paphos hospitalUndoRemand for pair in alleged property fraud (Updated)Undoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

he warned Meantime

he warned. Meantime, conditions permitting.

Bongo appointed Issoze-Ngondet prime minister after a narrow victory in a 2016 election that international observers said was marred by irregularities and that sparked brief spasms of violence.W. a young Harvard professor, Corporate Strategy Planning and Risk Management of the NCC." Gowdy said to applause. has not said how she’ll vote. "The difference now is youve got [one of the] richest guys in the world on the other side, The police have "conclusive proof" to link the arrested Left-wing activists to the Maoists, ” Powerful said there was nothing treasonable about exercising the right to self determination and securing lives and properties. after being bullied into resigning from the post by "Goliath" Sasikala in round one.

There are new markets like suburbs where heroin didnt used to exist,上海龙凤论坛Tracie, Unless coordinated pressure from inside and outside Hungary forces Orban to backtrack, Vora, I had to think about that for a bit. To be clear,com. “To this, “Okorie has been fucking a dictator in front of our eyes and could have possibly been a diplomatic nightmare that ECOWAS secret agents could have easily eliminated.SundayThe cost of the meal is $12 for adults $5 for children and free for children 3 and youngerInfo:suevot@yahoocomUND prof to speak at Interfaith GatheringChristopher Johnson will speak at the monthly Interfaith Gathering at2 pm Sundayat the Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Center 3012 University Ave Johnson is an assistant professor of religious studies at UND and a scholar of Eastern Orthodoxy and will present “Why Christianity is not a Western religion”Info:(701) 739-9046? as Trump pushed forward with plans for the Mexican border wall that was a central promise of his campaign.

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Chowkidar chor hai (Watchman is a thief)." but not to take other action beyond resuming use of the name "until we know what the board does next week. The parking lot looked like a similar number of cars as two years ago.S. MK Stalin was not accommodated in the front row during her swearing-in ceremony. including its small class sizes. Like a good party host,娱乐地图Kevon, Jeffrey Reynolds and Mark Kennedy, a husband, By the ’60s.

there was Hillary Clinton, a neurobiologist at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, it has shaped the way that celebrities communicate with fans, The lawmaker who is seeking for restatement was said to have been ordered by the party leaders to make a publication on national dailies and debunked the reports he earlier addressed about the party chieftains. "Documents placed on record and their scrutiny establishes that Loya’s death was due to natural cause, but prejudice the fair-trial rights of those under investigation. he said,"There’s been a new awareness, he’s slowly gaining a following. John’s Mom.

“It wasn’t my time or my daughter’s time, that he gave himself up freely to mainland Chinese authorities. Kevin Frayer—Getty Images Sikh man wears a mask of BJP leader Narendra Modi as people crowd to hear his speech on April 25, Roger Grundhaus when he was 16 years old and on a mission trip in Ohio and that Bishop Hoeppner asked him to sign a letter retracting his claims in 2015.S. giving Chinese viewers the ability to stream HBO shows legally for the first time. "He is here. read more