Brazil into RSPL playoffs

first_imgBrazil of St Ann defeated St Georges of Portland 4-3 on penalties to win the Charley’s JB Rum Eastern Confederation Super League football title, this after battling to a 1-1 scoreline in regulation and extra-time in the final at Drax Hall on Sunday.Brazil joins KSAFA’s Maverley/Hughenden, Western Confederation’s Granville and the South Central Confederation’s Jamalco in the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) play-offs, which begin on Sunday. The top two will qualify for next season’s RSPL.St George’s jumped in front right after the half-time break when Tyrone Brown scored for the Carl Brissett-coached team. But the Portland team was reduced to 10 men shortly after, when Oneil Brown was ejected for violent conduct.By the 57th minute, Brazil were right back in it when Andre Reid fired home a free kick for the equaliser.”Brazil is the stronger and the better team, and we have more fighting spirit,” said their head coach, David Galloway.”It was a tense moment, but we knew that once we got to penalties, Brazil would win because we have the better kickers and the better goalkeeper. We missed one penalty, but we knew we would bounce back and come out victorious,” he added.St Georges’ team manager, Cedric Ormsby, thought his team had a bad day.”It just wasn’t our day in terms of the matchup between us and Brazil. We are a far better team, but it was just a bad day, and bad days come in any sport. But we are very disappointed,” he stated.last_img read more

Update:  Crater-Count Dating Squabble Unresolved

first_imgRemember the revelation last year that many craters on Mars used to infer ages may have been secondary impacts from fallback debris? (see 10/20/2005 entry).  Well, a microsymposium on this subject was held in Houston in March, and Richard Kerr in Science1 said that “125 planetary scientists deadlocked over how to apply crater-dating techniques to recent Mars history.”    Some are adamant that most craters are secondaries, and that they are difficult to distinguish from primaries, while others feel their methods produce consistent dating results.  If the former are right, however, then crater counts “have little to do with telling time,” Kerr wrote.  Inferences about ages of features in geological history built on these dating methods could be “off by orders of magnitude.”    Support for the secondary-crater explanation comes from ground level.  It shows that the process occurs even at small scales:Close-up images from the Mars rover Spirit also suggest that secondaries dominate small craters on Mars, too.  Geologist Matthew Golombek of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, a Spirit team member, reported on a survey of impact craters measuring from 10 centimeters to a couple of hundred meters across.  Spirit found that they are all far shallower and less bowllike than primary craters tend to be.  The high speed of impactors falling in from the asteroid belt makes for relatively deeper craters than those made by slower ejecta blocks of the same size.  “Almost every crater you see looks like a secondary,” said Golombek.1Richard A. Kerr, “Planetary Science: Who Can Read the Martian Clock?”, Science, 26 May 2006: Vol. 312. no. 5777, pp. 1132 – 1133, DOI: 10.1126/science.312.5777.1132.Before this realization came to light, the assumption was that meteoroids produced a steady rain of impactors on a planet or moon, allowing scientists to estimate the age of the surface.  “The concept sounds simple enough,” Kerr said, nostalgically; “To decipher the geologic history of other bodies in the solar system, count craters formed by the slow rain of bombarding rocks.  The more craters on a lava flow, glacial debris, or a flood deposit, the farther back in time a volcano erupted, ice flowed, or water gushed.”  Now, we know that “In practice, however, telling geologic time beyond Earth has proved tricky.”  A sidebar shows that there is even debate on how the impacts took place, and whether there was a catastrophic period of bombardment, or a slow decrease in events in the first million years of the solar system.    But wait; about that first million years – it is inferred from studies of the moon, which were dated by crater counts.  And the moon is also dated by extrapolation of dating methods from earth which were largely accepted due to their allowance of time for Darwinian evolution.  What if evolution is not true?  And what if the dating methods on Earth are flawed?  Can secular scientists really know anything about ages in the solar system?  Don’t count on it.  Assumption is the mother of confusion.(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Spotted Sea Leviathan Visits Port of Los Angeles

first_imgImage Courtesy: CMA CGMCMA CGM George Washington, a newly built ultra large container vessel (ULCV) owned by French shipping giant CMA CGM, arrived recently at the Port of Los Angeles on its maiden voyage. Built at Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) shipyard in South Korea, the 14,414 TEU boxship was delivered to CMA CGM on April 20, the company’s data shows.CMA CGM G. Washinton, which flies the flag of the United Kingdom, features a length of 366 meters and a width of 48.2 meters.The giant boxship has a market value of USD 103.28 million, according to information provided by VesselsValue.Currently, CMA CGM’s fleet is made up of 444 vessels with a combined capacity of 2.208 million TEUs.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more