Fuel truck spill closes Alaska Highway north of Liard Hot Springs

first_imgUPDATE – The Highway is now open to single-lane alternating traffic.FORT NELSON, B.C. — The Alaska Highway is closed because of a spill involving a fuel truck between Liard Hot Springs and the Yukon border.According to the B.C. Ministry of Environment, at around 1:00 am this morning, a transport truck carrying roughly 55,000 litres of fuel was reported to have overturned on the Alaska Highway at Mile 543. No leak was reported at the time of the crash, but in an update at 7:45 a.m., the RCMP confirmed that the load was leaking. Members of the Watson Lake Fire Department and additional RCMP are en route to the incident site. The overturned truck is approximately 500 m from the Liard River.The responding Environmental Emergency Response Officer with the Ministry has reached out to the local Emergency Program Coordinator and local First Nations to notify them of the incident. The officer is currently preparing to conduct an overflight of the incident site.The Alaska Highway is currently closed in both directions. Biil Woodworth with the federal government agency responsible for the Alaska Highway north of Mile 84 says that an update on the situation is expected at noon.This is a developing story, and we’ll have an update once we receive more information.last_img read more

Bikini Fashion Show in Front Hassan Mosque in Rabat in the

Rabat – During the 1960s, Morocco was the hosting venue of a swimwear fashion show organized by a British manufacturer seeking to unveil its latest swim brands collection.A video posted to YouTube by channel Far Maroc shows international models posing in bikinis and other beach clothing at a fashion show held in the capital Rabat in 1967.Among those invited to the fashion show is the late Princess Lalla Nouzha, a sister of late King of Morocco, Hassan II. In addition to posing in bikinis next to a hotel swimming pool, the models are also seen in the video posing on the Rabat beach and at the esplanade of tour Hassan mosque. read more

Navy files criminal case against 10 Indian fishermen

A Sri Lanka court has slapped criminal cases against 10 of the 19 fishermen from Pudukottai, 27 days after they were arrested at Killinochi, the Press Trust of India reported.S Emirit and P Sesuraja, President and Secretary respectively of Tamil Nadu Coastal Fishermen’s Association, said the navy had charged them for “deliberately” colliding their boat with the Sri Lankan high speed modern patrol boat and damaging it. Emiret requested the Tamil Nadu government to intervene and save them. The Judicial Magistrate Jawahabdeen remanded the fishermen till November 18. The fishermen from Pudukottai district were arrested last month when they were fishing in the Paruthithurai sea and near Kattaikaadu, a Sri Lankan coastal area. read more

Goodman School seeks distinguished grad nominations

The Goodman School of Business has once again begun its annual search for notable graduates.Nominations are now open for its Distinguished Graduate award.Nominees must have graduated from the Faculty of Business or Goodman School of Business with a BAdmin, BAcc, BBA, MAcc or MBA and have at least five years work and life experience since graduating.They must also demonstrate at least one of the following:• Outstanding professional achievements• Outstanding education achievements• Outstanding community achievements• Outstanding volunteer achievements• Outstanding entrepreneurial achievements• An ongoing commitment to Brock UniversityNominations are due July 31 and should consist of a letter outlining the nominee’s achievements, two additional letters of support or newspaper clippings, a resume, list of awards or journal articles.Winners are chosen by a committee consisting of the Dean, department chairs and graduates.For more information or to submit a nomination, contact Susan Leblanc. read more

UN relief agencies distribute food and seeds to half a million in

As part of the “Seeds Protection Ration,” the UN World Food Programme (WFP) has started to distribute 5,800 tons of food aid to assist 535,000 vulnerable people in provinces most affected by insecurity in Burundi. The food aid will be given together with seeds and farm tools provided by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).The rationing is enough to last 20 days, and is planned for two planting seasons – in September-October and February-March – and is normally carried out every year in Burundi due to its success.”This programme is expected to contribute towards increased agricultural production of the most vulnerable populations, which will improve their food security,” said Mustapha Darboe, WFP’s Country Director in Burundi. “Farmers can market the food surpluses, and use the income to create assets as well as improve their livelihoods.”Continual fighting in Burundi has resulted in significant population displacements, erosion of assets, significant livestock theft, as well as destruction of homesteads. Nearly 1.4 million people in Burundi, mainly internally displaced persons, do not have adequate access to food and thus depend on WFP food assistance. read more

Were all hurting Calgary arts cut to the bone as corporate funds

Vicki Stroich, Alberta Theatrre Projects executive director, sits in an empty theatre in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, March 16, 2017. Calgary’s performing arts scene has become a casualty of corporate cost cutting as the city’s economic doldrums drag into their third year, prompting organizations to band together to seek more municipal support. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh ‘We’re all hurting’: Calgary arts cut to the bone as corporate funds dry up CALGARY – Calgary’s performing arts scene has become a casualty of corporate cost-cutting as the city’s economic doldrums drag into a third year, prompting organizations to band together to seek more municipal support.The energy sector has long been a stalwart patron of the arts in the white-collar heart of the oilpatch. But weak energy markets have forced firms to tighten their spending, leaving less for sponsorships.The issue came into stark relief earlier this month when Alberta Theatre Projects, a 45-year-old institution, put out an urgent plea for donations. It said it wasn’t sure it could survive past the upcoming season without a significant cash infusion by May 1.“There’s a level of uncertainty in the corporate environment and we get it. We understand,” said Vicki Stroich, ATP executive director.The organization’s corporate sponsorship dollars have dropped 70 per cent since the price of oil spiked above US$100 a barrel three years ago — more than double what it is now — and then plummeted.The company, with a focus on new Canadian plays, was facing a $400,000 shortfall. Half of that was filled by a donation from the Calgary Foundation, a local philanthropic organization.About three weeks after its plea, ATP was halfway way toward raising the remaining $200,000.The mid-sized theatre company needs the money to hold it over while it figures out how to keep itself going in the long term, said Stroich.“We’re not a supertanker, but we’re also not a tiny speedboat that can turn on a dime.”Calgary ranks among the lowest in Canada when it comes to municipal grants for the arts, said Patti Pon, who leads the city’s arts development organization.Data compiled by Calgary Arts Development shows the city gets $6.50 per capita in ongoing grant funding, which excludes capital investments. By contrast, Vancouver gets $19.36.In boom times, the disparity wasn’t a problem because of the corporate sector’s generosity. Now, there’s only so far arts outfits can stretch their dollars.“I think we’re at that point where it’s going to snap. It’s going to break,” said Pon.“Just because companies are not-for-profit doesn’t mean that they’re for-loss. You do have to have your inputs be greater than your outputs over the long run.”Some of the city’s main arts players met recently to discuss their collective challenges and the appeal they plan to make to the city.Colleen Smith, executive director of Theatre Calgary, said her company is not in as dire a situation as ATP, but she’s worried about the tight-knit theatre community as a whole.“It’s a bad situation and I really fear that if we don’t rectify what’s happening right now, we can lose some significant organizations in the very near future.”Ann Connors with One Yellow Rabbit Performance Theatre said her company can’t cut much deeper without sacrificing quality.“We already operate to the bone,” she said. “It’s safe to say we’re all hurting in some way.”The company’s month-long High Performance Rodeo festival in January was well attended, but still missed box office targets because of lower ticket prices.“That’s a pretty strong message. It says people want to come out and people want to see it, but there’s a challenge in what they can afford to do.”The Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra has seen little change in attendance, but there’s been a big shift in which seats are snapped up first, said president and CEO Paul Dornian.“In good times, the good seats go first and now it’s sort of the reverse,” he said.Ticket revenues dropped $300,000 between 2015 and 2016.“With quite comparable audience numbers, we’re seeing somewhat less revenue.”Donations dropped by about one-quarter in 2016 compared with 2015.“It’s been a challenge, but I still feel great about our organization,” said Dornian. “We’re not going to stop making music because of the price of oil.” by Lauren Krugel, The Canadian Press Posted Mar 26, 2017 8:00 am MDT Last Updated Mar 26, 2017 at 8:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

Vial thieves threw away John Paul IIs blood

first_imgTHIEVES ACCUSED OF stealing a religious relic stained with Polish pope John Paul II’s blood threw it away thinking it worthless, Italian media said today, reporting the police had detained three people.The three “did not understand the relic’s value” and “cannot remember where they threw away the precious loot”, the ANSA news agency said, citing the police.Police recovered the object’s metal frame but could not find the cloth, believed to be part of the robe the pontiff was wearing when he was shot in an assassination attempt in St Peter’s Square in 1981.It was stolen on Saturday along with a cross, which has also been found, from the San Pietro della Ienca church in the mountainous Abruzzo region in central Italy where the late pope loved to go on skiing holidays.The PrimaDaNoi.it Abruzzo news website said two of those arrested are 23 and 24 years old and are drug addicts known to the police for other petty crimes.The relic is a framed, tiny square of cloth.The relic was given to the small church in 2011 by Stanislaw Dziwisz, a cardinal who served as John Paul II’s personal secretary until his death in 2005.Local media said some 50 police officers and sniffer dogs were deployed in the search for the missing relic in an area famed for its weathered stone houses and the little church where the head of the Roman Catholic Church once reportedly took refuge in a storm.John Paul II and the Italian pope John XXIII, known as “Good Pope John”, are set to become saints in a ceremony at the Vatican in April – an event which will substantially increase the value of the stolen relic.- © AFP, 2014Read: Vial thieves steal blood of Pope John Paul II>last_img read more

Elephants tuberculeuses la fondation Brigitte Bardot veut prendre en charge les animaux

first_imgElephants tuberculeuses : la fondation Brigitte Bardot veut prendre en charge les animauxLundi, la Fondation Brigitte Bardot a demandé dans une lettre ouverte adressée au préfet du Rhône que les éléphantes Baby et Népal, soupçonnées d’être tuberculeuses, lui soient confiées. “Sauvons Baby et Népal” ! C’est ce qu’a clamé dans une lettre ouverte dévoilée lundi Brigitte Bardot au sujet des deux éléphantes soupçonnées d’avoir la tuberculose. Vendredi, le tribunal administratif de Lyon, saisi par Gilbert Edelstein, directeur du cirque Pinder et propriétaire des éléphantes, a en effet donné raison au préfet, qui a ordonné l’euthanasie des deux pachydermes, après le décès par tuberculose d’une troisième éléphante. Face à cette nouvelle décision, Brigitte Bardot a donc décidé de réagir en adressant une lettre au préfet dans laquelle elle lui demande de lui confier les deux éléphantes. Pour cela, elle réclame un nouvel arrêté, non plus d’abattage de Baby et Népal, mais de saisie afin que ces animaux soient confiés à sa Fondation qui pourra leur assurer une fin de vie digne, dans un parc de quarantaine où elles pourront être soignées sans risque de contamination avec d’autres animaux ou du public.”Ma Fondation a déjà pris en charge de nombreux animaux sauvages saisis de cirques mouroirs, nous avons même financé une structure d’accueil pour les félins, très nombreux à vivre l’enfer dans leur cage de transport. Nous avons pris en charge également un hippopotame maltraité chez Zavatta pour le transférer en Afrique du Sud dans une réserve naturelle et participons, depuis des années, au financement d’un hôpital pour éléphants en Thaïlande…”, assure t-elle dans la lettre dénonçant les “négligences de Monsieur Edelstein”.Pour un meilleur dépistage de la tuberculose chez les éléphantsÀ lire aussiTuberculose : pulmonaire, osseuse ou ganglionnaire, de quoi s’agit-il ?Ajouté à cela, la Fondation et sa présidente accusent les autorités sanitaires, pourtant “parfaitement conscientes des risques humains” de ne pas jouer leur “rôle d’alerte” : “la tuberculose est présente chez les éléphants mais le dépistage n’est pas obligatoire ! Si tous les éléphants présents sur notre territoire devaient être testés, il faudrait ensuite prononcer l’euthanasie de 25% d’entre eux !”. Elles s’attaquent également aux cirques “qui exploitent de façon ignoble et dans des conditions inadaptées les animaux sauvages comme les éléphants” et les zoos “qui présentent des espèces sauvages dans des enclos misérables et qui n’interviennent pas pour les sauver de l’extinction”. “Il faut arrêter de se cacher derrière la magie du cirque et dénoncer cet odieux mensonge des circassiens qui prétendent aimer leurs animaux !”, clament-elles encore dans la lettre qui n’a pas encore trouvé de réponse. Le 24 décembre 2012 à 19:05 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Dominicas Prime Minister Met with Prime Minister Minnis

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, September 25, 2017 – Nassau – The Hon. Roosevelt Skerrit, Prime Minister of Dominica, which was recently ravaged by Hurricane Maria, stopped in Nassau Sunday morning, September 24, and met at Jet Aviation with Prime Minister Dr. the Hon. Hubert Minnis, Minister of Financial Services, Trade & Industry and Immigration the Hon. Brent Symonette, and Minister of Transport and Local Government the Hon. Frankie Campbell.Inside the private jet facility, they are pictured discussing the hurricane’s devastation, left to right: PM Dr. Minnis, Mr. Campbell, PM Skerrit, and Mr. Symonette.  In second photo, outside, gestures of goodwill.(BIS Photos/Peter Ramsay)Release: BIS Related Items:last_img read more

Kolasinac reveals Arsenal support after error at United

first_imgSead Kolasinac has revealed how Arsenal players supported him after his gaffe handed Jesse Lingard a goal in their 2-2 draw at United on Wednesday.Arsenal had just taken the lead through a Marcos Rojo own goal, but one minute, an error by Kolasinac gifted United an equalizer.After the game, Unai Emery praised Kolasinac for his overall performance to lift his spirit as he looked miserable.“It’s a good feeling coming into the dressing room like that,” Kolasinac told Sky Sports.harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…“Especially after knowing you’ve made a mistake and that mistake has potentially cost us two points. It made me feel better.“The manager told me in no uncertain terms not to get too down about it, and that did help me. Everyone in the team too, it wasn’t just the coaching staff.“All the players came over and they consoled me and told me not to get too down about it, and it gives you belief and confidence. You notice then we’re a tight-knit team and I think it’s a positive.”last_img read more

Vancouvers ProtoPlant produces filament used in 3D printers

first_imgAll 3-D printing starts with a computer design, which serves as a virtual blueprint. Sophisticated 3-D printers, which cost up to several million dollars apiece, spray or squirt out layers of metal, rubber and plastic to form an object.The technology is already being used to create artificial limbs and could someday be used to churn out food, too.A traditional prosthetic limb might cost tens of thousands of dollars, but 3-D printers can slash the cost to $100 or even less. This especially benefits children, who grow quickly enough that they need to be refitted frequently for new prostheses.A high school science class in Durham, N.C., is using a 3-D printer this school year to create functional prosthetic hands for three children. Each hand costs just $20 to $30 in materials, using a $2,600 printer.3-D printers have been used to help animals, too.In 2012, scientists used a 3-D printer to construct a prosthetic beak tip for a rescued bald eagle named Beauty. With a custom-printed prosthesis, the eagle was able to drink water and preen herself for the first time since being shot in the face by a poacher.The Department of Defense recently approved funding for research that could lead to 3-D-printed food. The idea is to blast dehydrated meats and vegetables into nutrient-dense concoctions that could then be reconstituted in the field. Scientists expect that technology to be available as soon as 2025.last_img read more

Delta Corp files High Court petition seeking casino license in Daman and

first_img Lack of premium mass strategy begs questions of SJM’s Grand Lisboa Palace launch: analysts Strong VIP growth sees Okada Manila GGR climb 72% in August Genting’s Resorts World Las Vegas names five key additions to executive team Daman and Diu is one of three states and territories in India where casino gaming is legal but there are currently no casinos in operation. Delta Corp operates three offshore casinos in Goa and one land-based casino in each of Goa and Sikkim.According to Indian gaming news website Glaws, Delta Corp’s subsidiary has named the Union Territory Administration of Daman and Diu, the Administrator of Daman and Diu and the Director of Tourism of the Union Territory Administration as respondents to its petition.The company wants the Bombay High Court to compel authorities in Daman and Diu to issue its license under Section 13A of the Goa, Daman and Diu Public Gambling Act, 1976. India’s largest casino operator, Delta Corp, has filed a writ petition with the Bombay High Court in the hope of forcing authorities in the union territory of Daman and Diu to issue a casino license.The move comes four years after Delta Corp opened five-star resort The Deltin in Daman via its subsidiary, Daman Hospitality Private Limited, with plans to launch casino operations. However, the company has still not received regulatory approval from local authorities. RelatedPosts Load Morelast_img read more

37 of financial organisations introduce flexibleworking initiatives

first_imgOver a third (37%) of financial service organisation respondents have introduced, or are planning to introduce, flexible-working initiatives as part of their employee value proposition, according to research by Mercer.Its Global financial services executive compensation snapshot survey, which polled 68 financial services organisations across 20 countries in Europe, North America and Asia, also found that to better attract and retain talent, 34% of respondents are planning to introduce or already have in place a non-monetary recognition programme.The research also found:43% of respondents have or are planning to introduce remote working programmes.50% of banking organisation respondents plan to make changes to their performance management processes in the next 12 months, compared to 16% of insurer respondents.91% of banking organisation respondents and 72% of insurance organisation respondents have bonus malus policies in place, largely due to regulation. Malus enables the clawback of deferred bonuses, such as in instances of misconduct or risk management failings.Mark Quinn (pictured), partner and head of the talent business at Mercer UK, said: “Following the financial crisis, the reputation of traditional financial services firms suffered badly. Esteem turned to stigma as a new generation of graduates started rejecting a culture they viewed as aggressive and lacking in integrity.“Banks, in particular, who have been struggling to attract and retain the best new talent, are realising that these so-called millennials are not just in it for the money. They look for a sense of pride and purpose in their work, as well as flexibility and career support. To attract them, [organisations] need to develop a strong and genuine purpose-led employee value proposition.”last_img read more

ATT provides free texting calling for those affected by Irma

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – Being able to communicate with loved ones during and after storms like Hurricane Irma may be difficult, and local cell phone companies said they are stepping up to the task.It’s easy to take for granted our cell phones and service, especially in the wake of a storm. Many lose power and cell phone service, but AT&T said they are making things easier for people who were in Irma’s path.“We know there is never a more critical time for people to be able to stay connected,” said AT&T spokesperson Kelly Starling.AT&T has offered free calls and text messaging for those without a way to communicate with loved ones.An AT&T customer and tourist from California was visiting St. Maarten when Irma made landfall. Now, he’s focused on getting back home and helping locals.“I’m trying to give people my phone to call their loved ones,” said the unnamed tourist.AT&T has suggested keeping phones charged and dry. “Portable devices allow you to charge multiple devices at one time or even something like a car charger,” said Starling. She added to make sure you have all your emergency information programed on your phone. “That includes your local police department, the fire station, hospitals,” said Starling.AT&T said they were not just prepared for everything during Irma, but they were also ready for post-Irma activity.Emergency response equipment and teams have been staged and ready for cell phone towers that may be down.A statement on AT&T’s website states its National Reliability Center is monitoring outages for quick action while testing high-capacity back-up batteries at cell sites and protecting physical facilities against flooding.“How long those back-up batteries last depends on how much network traffic the cell site handles,” said Starling. “In addition to those high-capacity batteries, we also have generators in our cell site in our hurricane cone area. Those will kick in if the batteries die.”AT&T said they expect a high call volume and to try keeping non-emergency calls to a minimum. Remember, text messaging might be an easier and faster option to let someone know you are OK, AT&T added.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Heres What You Need To Know About The Texas Bathroom Bill

first_imgSCOTT BEALE VIA FLICKRAt the Texas Capitol in Austin, battle lines are sharpening around one of this year’s biggest fights over social issues. It’s a battle over bathrooms, specifically which bathrooms transgender peobathrooms transgple should be allowed to use. Supporters and opponents have already been lobbing attacks. Here’s what you need to know.Listen to the KERA News story.What are we talking about when we talk about so-called bathroom bills?“The bills take different forms in different places, but all of them in one way or another limit or prohibit transgender people from using bathrooms that match their gender at birth. In North Carolina, for example, it’s illegal to use the bathroom that doesn’t match the sex marked on one’s birth certificate.“In Texas, the proposed legislation is a bit more limited. Senate Bill 6, proposed by Texas Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, would mandate that transgender people use bathrooms, locker rooms or other sex-segregated intimate spaces in public schools, government buildings and public universities based on ‘biological sex’ instead of their gender identity. It does not mandate what private businesses or entities can and can’t do.“The bill would also block local nondiscrimination ordinances that guarantee transgender people the right to use the facilities that matches their gender identity.” Why do proponents say this is needed?“Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick emerged this spring as the chief advocate for a so-called bathroom bill. He says it’s a privacy issue and a safety issue – the bill is called the Privacy Protection Act. He’s said he’s afraid that transgender non-discrimination protections that allow transgender people to use bathrooms or locker rooms that correspond with their gender identity might entice sexual predators to pretend to be transgender in order to prey on women and girls in bathrooms.“Patrick also frames this as a fight against a liberal agenda. At a press conference announcing the legislation, he said, “You can mark today as the day that Texas is drawing a line in the sand and saying no. The privacy and safety of Texans is our top priority, not political correctness.”What do opponents of the legislation say?“Transgender advocates are really bothered by this safety claim. They say transgender people aren’t predators, and there isn’t evidence that more crimes occur when transgender people are allowed to use the bathroom they’re most comfortable with. Also, they point out, sexual assault remains a crime.”The business community in Texas has come out strongly against the legislation as well.“The Texas Association of Business and visitors bureaus across the state say anti-LGBT legislation like Senate Bill 6 will hurt tourism because people could Texas as a discriminatory place. That, they contend, will make be harder to attract high-profile sports events or big conventions if organizations aren’t sure their fans or attendees will feel welcome. They also say it’ll make it hard for employers to attract top talent to the state, and that businesses will look elsewhere when they plan to relocate or expand.“House Speaker Joe Straus says that’s his concern. ‘I think we should be very careful about doing something that could make Texas less competitive for investments, jobs and the highly skilled workforce needed to compete,’ Straus told the Texas Association of Business, adding that it’s his personal view.”A Texas Association of Business study projected major economic fallout from the legislature, but those numbers have come into question.“The study, conducted in conjunction with graduate students at St. Edwards University in Austin, projected that Texas could face between $964 million and $8.5 billion in lost GDP, and up to 185,000 lost jobs if the state passes anti-LGBT legislation.“PolitiFact Texas looked into those numbers, and found serious problems with the data that was used to support those conclusions. The fact-checking website labeled the claim ‘mostly false,’ but it also held up the basic thrust of the business group’s argument: that Texas will likely see a detrimental economic impact if it goes forward with anti-LGBT legislation.“Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick trumpeted the ‘mostly false’ claim, and panned the underlying assumption that economic damage would be caused by the legislation.“But on Friday, the National Football League seemed to give credence to the claim that the anti-LGBT laws would have an effect. In a statement to the Houston Chronicle, the league said that laws considered discriminatory would be a factor taken into consideration when awarding future Super Bowls.”So where does this go from here?“This cues up a potential fight between the House and the Senate on this issue. Patrick, who leads the state senate, has said he thinks his chamber will pass the bill. But it’s an open question if it’ll even come up for a vote in the House. Gov. Greg Abbott has been largely silent on the issue.“It also exposes a tension between the Republican Party’s wing that is motivated more by social issues and the more business-focused side of the party.“Whatever happens, this is an issue expected to continue to generate a lot of activity before the session is over.”Copyright 2017 KERA-FM. To see more, visit KERA-FM. Sharelast_img read more

Mothering Justice Hosts Women Legislators

first_imgBy George Kevin Jordan, AFRO Staff WriterIt was a meeting of the minds as Mothering Justice held a discussion panel with some of the countries top leaders to discuss issues that dramatically impact women, mothers and families.Several attendees gathered at the American Federation of Teachers on New Jersey Ave. NW,  as well as online for the livestream of the event. In attendance were Rep. Bed Haaland, (D-MI), Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), Rep. Brenda Lawrence (D-MI) Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) and Rep. Lauren Underwood (D-IL) and a host of other thought leaders and policy makers.(L-R) Eboni Taylor, Danielle Atkinson, Rep Tlaib, Kelli Garcia and Sen. Kamala Harris were some of the panelists at the Mothering Justice forum. (Courtesy Photo)Mothering Justice is a statewide organization based in Michigan dedicated to empowering mothers to lobbyists. The organization works in advocacy, leadership development, and voter engagement.  Key agenda items for the organization is raising the minimum wage, family medical leave insurance (FMLI), maternal justice– which champions issues of infant and maternal mortality and sustaining safety net programs for mothers and families such as SNAP and Medicaid.Rep. Tlaib shared stories of real women, her constituents facing inequities in Michigan, from the shutting down of day care programs, to lead in the water, saying,  “It’s really important as we look at these policy issues that we also uplift these stories, and if we do nothing what that looks like.”“It’s hard out here. I am very vulnerable cause I’m like ‘what do you mean you don’t understand why people are on the food line when there’s a shutdown? ‘Well why can’t they get a loan?’ That’s the reality of what we have in Congress,” Tlaib said.“The movement outside the halls of Congress is where things are going to happen.” One of the main issues on the table was Labor Project for Working Families. “When we don’t have paid medical leave, families lose money,” said Carol Joyner, director of the Labor Project for Working Families (LPWF) with Family Values at Work (FV@W).“These are purely economic issues. We’re hoping we see the strongest paid leave bill out of Congress to cover [those] who need time to welcome a new baby, take care of someone sick in their family or take care of themselves.”Sade Moonsammy, director of operations and strategic planning for LPWF with FV@W, said it’s also important to address our ever expanding concept of family. “It’s also talking about the definition of family and who’s involved in family. This is an issue beyond women. This is a non-binary issue, it’s a trans issue; this is how we look at all the intersections of family. It doesn’t matter if it passes, if families are cut out of it.”“Before you can fix any problem you have to know it’s happening,” Rep. Lawrence said. “When you look at poverty in America the largest group is women and children. A woman in poverty- almost 60 percent of her pay goes to childcare. When we look at the largest amount of student debt it’s women.”Sen. Harris brought home the fact that mother’s issues is everyone’s issue saying, “What is good for the mothers of our country is good for the babies of our country, is good for our country.”“There have been many times when people come up to me and say ‘Kamala tell us about women’s issues.’  And I say, ‘You know what I am so glad you want to talk about the economy.’ Because we know when you lift up the economic status of women, you lift up the economic status of families of neighborhoods and community and all of society.” Danielle Atkinson, founding director of the organization said next steps for  Mothering Justice, is to “continue to push this issue in the state.”“We are organizing, but we want to continue to raise these issues and make sure they are front and center in 2020,” Atkinson said.  “In all of those races the presidential, the congressional, those candidates are forced to address these issues and what their plan is to solve them.”For more information about Mothering Justice and their movement please go to https://motheringjustice.org/last_img read more

Honesty makes relationships work Lily Collins

first_imgThe 25-year-old doesn’t think there’s an ultimate secret to falling in love and staying in love, but believes that being truthful with your partner builds the best foundation for long-term happiness, reports bangshowbiz.com.‘It doesn’t matter how long it takes to get there, to be in love, as long as in the end people are honest. When you’re honest it pays off,’ she said.‘Everyone has their own speed at which they’re honest, so I would say it’s beautiful but it depends on person to person,’ added Collins. Also Read – A fresh blend of fameThe actress plays Rosie Dunne, the romantic interest of Sam Clafin’s alter ego Alex Stewart in her latest role in Love, Rosie, which sees the two best friends slowly realise that they have fallen for each other.Collins is best known for her roles in the films The Blind Side (2009), Abduction (2011), and Mirror Mirror (2012). She portrayed Clary Fray in the fantasy film adaptation The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (2013), based on Cassandra Clare’s best-selling novel City of Bones.last_img read more

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first_img Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more In 1934, a Senate committee opened hearings its chairman said would show that America’s involvement in WWI was “not a matter of national honor and national defense, but a matter of profit for the few.” Ninety-three hearings and 200 witnesses, however, did little to support that claim. Rather the hearings drew increased attention to arms manufacturers as “merchants of death” and inspired Congress to pass three neutrality acts that signaled “profound American opposition to overseas involvement” in the years preceding America’s entry into WWII.1Recently, Consumer Reports portrayed radiology as a new kind of death merchant. In an “investigative report” published online January 27, 2015, and slated for its March 2015 issue, Consumer Reports heralded “The surprising dangers of computed tomography (CT) scans and X-rays,” stating in the article that “one-third of CT scans in the U.S. (about 24 million by current estimates) serve little if any medical purpose.”The article presented radiologists as callously exposing unwitting patients to deadly radiation, stating that the overuse of CT is caused at least partly “by greed and money,” and advising readers to get a second opinion “if your doctor owns a CT scanner or has a financial interest in an imaging center.”The medical community agrees that minimizing radiation dose is important. National and international efforts to raise awareness about the need to reduce dosage are underway. These include Image Gently, developed by the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging; Image Wisely, run jointly by the American College of Radiology (ACR), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT); and EuroSafe Imaging, organized by the European Society of Radiology.More remains to be done. Every trade meeting where CT is discussed features a speaker or paper addressing ways to cut dose through image-enhancing software or techniques that cut the voltage applied to X-ray generators.Low-dose scanners have proliferated in vendor portfolios since the late-2000s. That these scanners, or low-dose upgrades, have not been more widely adopted is a withering indictment of the medical community, one curiously absent from the Consumer Reports article.Going directly to consumers with concerns about dose has merit. But sowing fear, as Consumer Reports has done, with assertions that 15,000 Americans will “die this year because of cancers caused by the radiation in CT scans alone” has a better chance of producing medical luddites than an informed populace.In reality, estimates of cancers caused by imaging procedures are highly speculative “because of various random and systematic uncertainties embedded in them,” wrote William R. Hendee, Ph.D., emeritus professor of radiology, radiation oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin, in “Risk of medical imaging,” published in 2013 in the Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal.In his paper, Hendee wrote that “over the past few years papers have appeared in the scientific literature that predict thousands of cancers and cancer deaths each year in populations of patients receiving medical imaging procedures (primarily computed tomography) employing ionizing radiation. The predictions in these papers are computed by estimating very small and hypothetical risks at low radiation doses and multiplying these speculative estimates by large numbers of patients experiencing medical imaging. The public media use these papers to develop print and electronic news releases that raise anxiety in parents, families and patients, at times causing them to delay or defer needed imaging procedures. Decisions to delay or defer examinations constitute real risks to patients, as contrasted with the hypothetical risks presented in the papers.”Consumer Reports drew blindly from these assertions, citing researchers who estimate that “at least 2 percent of all future cancers in the U.S. — approximately 29,000 cases and 15,000 deaths per year — will stem from CT scans alone.”Some scientifically gathered data do indicate that CT radiation presents a significant, albeit small, risk to patient welfare. To its credit, Consumer Reports found and responsibly presented such data, specifically a 2013 Australian study that linked CT to the development of six more cancers per 10,000 pediatric patients than would naturally occur.What’s aggravating is the magazine’s use of half-truths and innuendo to create unwarranted fear. Consumer Reports stated that there are no federal radiation limits for any kind of CT imaging. It did not, however, say 43 states license facilities that expose patients to ionizing radiation, and more have laws pending to do the same.The states did so in response to the Consumer-Patient Radiation Health and Safety Act, adopted in 1981 by the U.S. Congress, which directs states to voluntarily develop minimum standards for state certification and licensure of personnel who perform medical and dental radiologic procedures.Similarly, the feds have enacted guidelines for the exposure of patients to ionizing radiation, updating them as recently as January, when the EPA revised radiation protection guidelines for federal facilities that image patients with X-rays. The voluntary guidelines outline recommendations “to keep patient dose as low as reasonably achievable without compromising the quality of patient care.”And, if Consumer Reports is to be taken literally, the word “any” is contradicted by its own website, which last fall recommended limitations on lung CT screening — limitations that have since been adopted by Medicare. And, in its most recent article about the dangers of CT and X-ray, Consumer Reports states that, “starting in 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services plans to cut reimbursement rates if CT machines don’t have the most recent safety features.”Nowhere is contradiction more obvious than in the headline that states “The Surprising Dangers of CT Scans and X-rays”, which is followed by text that reads: “It’s not surprising, then, that many patients have mistaken assumptions about the dangers of medical radiation.” So … which is it? Surprising or not?Consumer Reports’ shortcomings do not diminish the increasing need for action. While the annual number of CT procedures in the U.S. dropped about 5 percent in 2012 and again by that amount in 2013, according to IMV Medical information Division, volume appears to be on the rise, jumping from 76 million in 2013 to 81.2 million in 2014.Patients who, in conversations with their primary physicians, cite legitimate and documented concerns about radiation have a better chance of effecting change than those who come armed with exaggerated fears about cancer and death.·      Does the institution to which a patient is being referred apply a low-dose regimen?·      How much radiation will be exposed to the patient in the specific exam being ordered?·      If a child is being scanned, will the tech apply a pediatric protocol?Referring physicians who must answer such questions might ask the same of the radiologists to whom they refer patients. And that can only lead to safer practices.Radiology is moving in the right direction. Questions from patients, based on fact, will help radiology get to where it is going. Articles based on innuendo and half-truths will not. Instead, just as Senate hearings 80 years ago enabled warmongers to overwhelm Europe at the start of World War II, such attacks on radiology will stir fear that may prevent patients from obtaining needed medical imaging.Reference:1. https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/minute/merchants_of_death.htm, accessed Feb. 3, 2015.Also see:http://www.itnonline.com/content/itn-publisher-responds-consumer-reports-article-ct-scanning Blog | Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant | February 05, 2015 The New Merchants of Death Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant Greg Freiherr has reported on developments in radiology since 1983. He runs the consulting service, The Freiherr Group. Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medica read more center_img Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Walkaround AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:25Loaded: 11.42%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:25 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more Related Content News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Technology | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, a subsidiary of Shimadzu Corp., announced they have received U.S. Food and Drug… read more last_img read more

Hotelbeds unveils new extranet portal MaxiRoom

first_imgA new MaxiRoom extranet portal has been launched by Hotelbeds, which acts as a dashboard for its partner hotels.Through the tool, hoteliers will have “greater autonomy and control” including an interactive calendar, enabling changes to rates and room types. It facilitates an overall personalised usage with a new content manager that allows hotels to update their content, images and offers, a mass update tool that enables availability and pricing to be updated across multiple rates and room types, and a promotion manager that allows hotels to directly launch their own offers. The new system also provides “intelligent alerts” to hotel partners of any sold dates, missing descriptions or images.“The new Maxiroom platform has been embraced by the sector lots of enthusiasm. Feedback has been highly positive,” said Javier Arevalo, Product Director at Hotelbeds.last_img read more

January 02 2019

first_imgJanuary 02 , 2019 Drone Based Aerial Biocontrol from UAV-IQ Precision Agriculture on Vimeo.Over the course of a short series of upcoming articles, we will take a little deeper dive into certain aspects of biocontrol that we feel may be of particular interest to you. We’d love to hear from you – what would you like to learn about in future articles? Do you have any comments or questions about what you’ve read so far? Let us know – we read all the comments.UAV-IQ Precision Agriculture is a company that leverages precision agriculture technologies and best practices to help growers address labor shortages and make farming operations more profitable and sustainable. Opinion: Foretelling the Mexican mango season wind … You might also be interested in Opinion: Poland and Turkey have much in common wit … center_img Perishable Pundit: The words that can’t be spoken … The Packaging Pitch: Why the museum of ice cream i … By Andreas Neuman, CEO of UAV-IQ Precision AgricultureThis article is part of a series on biological control and Integrated Pest Management written by UAV-IQ. According to some studies, the global market for biological control agents within agriculture is predicted to grow from its 2015 level of USD $1.6 billion to USD $3.5 billion by 2021. Increased awareness of its effectiveness along with a desire to reduce chemical usage is leading to a 13% annual growth rate, but there still are lots of growers who have not yet had an opportunity to be introduced to the discipline of biocontrol. To that end, we hope this first article in a series exploring the topic is informative.There are nearly one million known species of insects, and their place in history is not a glorified one. They have been the culprit of numerous outbreaks of disease and famine, destroying humans’ hard-earned agriculture production with a seeming malice. However, only a relatively small percentage of insects pose a threat to crops. In fact, there are many useful or “beneficial” insects and mites who provide farmers around the world a valuable service preying and parasitizing pest population. These beneficials fall under two broad categories, predators such as the ladybug which hunts prey insects, and parasites such as some types of wasps that lay their eggs inside host insects, eventually killing them. Within both of these categories, there are generalists that target a wider array of prey or hosts, and specialists which narrow their target lists to a small number.Lady Beetle larva eating aphid (Source: Judy Gallagher, via Flickr)From Ancient Egypt to modern farmsBiocontrol (or “biological control”) is a proven method within the field of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) where pest populations are controlled by using their natural enemies. There are three basic applied biocontrol strategies; 1) Classical, which imports natural enemies from outside the local area, 2) Conservation, which seeks to enhance the effectiveness of existing beneficials, and 3) Augmentation, which boosts existing or re-integrates eliminated beneficial populations.Biocontrol is not a new concept. Ancient Egyptians used domestic cats to control the rodent populations that threatened their grain supplies, ancient Chinese citrus growers moved predaceous ant nests into their citrus fields and even built bamboo bridges so ants could more easily move from tree to tree, and Yemeni farmers traveled to North Africa to bring back predacious ant colonies for their local date groves. Even with the advent of powerful chemical pesticides, biocontrol has some distinct advantages – even outside of organic farms. First, and perhaps the best-known benefit, is the reduction in environmental, legal and public safety risks as biocontrol minimizes direct chemical exposure, groundwater contamination and the rise of resistant strains of insects. Second, biocontrol plans can be more selective than broad-spectrum chemicals, leaving intact other beneficial populations such as predatory mites which may be stealthily controlling outbreaks. While difficult to precisely quantify, the reduction of future outbreaks can clearly have tangible bottom-line results as treatment costs and losses are reduced. This can have positive bottom line results in the medium to long-term as treatment costs and loss due to future outbreaks may be reduced. Third, the beneficials can crawl high up into the canopy of trees and to the underside of leaves, areas where chemicals have a difficult time reaching and where some pests such as melon or cotton aphids tend to reside. Implementing biocontrol is easier than you may thinkOne common complaint about biocontrol is that it takes education and training to properly design and implement biocontrol as part of an integrated pest management plan. While this is true, there a growing number of experts in the field who are capable of prescribing highly customized and, most importantly, cost-effective plans. One of the first criteria they will assess is, what are the unique threshold levels for the grower? In simple terms, how much damage is “acceptable” before leaving pest populations untreated results in costs greater than the cost of treating it? This “acceptable” level of economic damage is directly correlated to the density of a pest population and sets an initial target for population control. Once an entomologist understands the grower’s economic constraints, they can start building a comprehensive preventative and curative pest management plan tailored for local threats. In addition to the growing body of knowledge driving the growth of biocontrol adoption around the world, advances in distribution technology are dramatically improving the precision at which control agents are released as well as opening up new crop types to biocontrol. For example, drones equipped with specialized hardware designed to release beneficials can compete on cost with manual labor – especially in tight labor markets such as California – and they also ensure a more even distribution and can reach the tops of canopies that are too tall for traditional (hand) applications. last_img read more