Wind Booms, Coal Suffers in Oversupplied Texas Grid

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence:When Vistra Energy Corp. subsidiary Luminant Generation Co. LLC announced on Oct. 13 that it would retire two large coal plants in Texas next year, the company stated that “these two plants are economically challenged in the competitive ERCOT market” because of “sustained low wholesale power prices, an oversupplied renewable generation market, and low natural gas prices, along with other factors.”That statement echoed what has become a truism among merchant generators operating in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas region: the rapid spread of cheap wind power is creating an oversupply of electricity in the Texas market. ERCOT oversees the grid that supplies most of Texas with its electricity.“ERCOT is currently oversupplied,” found a December 2016 report prepared for the Texas Clean Energy Coalition by the Brattle Group, Inc. that looked at grid reliability in the face of rising penetration of renewable energy sources and accelerating retirements of coal-fired plants, “and the forecasted additions of natural gas, solar, and wind generation should provide a cushion to absorb many of the retirements that may occur.”A market that appears oversupplied to an owner of coal-fired plants, however, may not appear so to a grid operator charged with maintaining adequate resources for summertime peak loads. What’s clear is that as the penetration levels of wind and solar generation climb toward and past the 20% threshold, the issues around supply and demand, grid stability and market functioning become more complex. And Texas, a pioneer in wind power, could serve as a glimpse into the future of the U.S. power grid as renewables become cheaper and more widespread.Even as peak loads have remained relatively flat in the region in the last few years, total operating capacity from all sources combined has continued to climb.And much of that new capacity comes from wind, which grew from just over 11,000 MW in 2013 to nearly 16,260 MW in 2016 — a 48% increase in just three years — despite a renewable energy mandate that was met years ago.Following a construction boom fueled by the federal tax credits and the state’s $8 billion investment in long-distance transmission lines, Texas has nearly 20,000 MW of wind power capacity. The state supplied 25% of U.S. wind power in 2016, and wind capacity in the state is expected to reach 25,500 MW by 2019. Along with abundant supplies of low-priced natural gas, all that wind has helped depress energy prices in Texas. Despite having, by far, the highest energy usage per capita in the nation, Texas enjoys energy prices per MWh among the lowest of any state.As the Luminant retirements indicated, low wholesale power prices are driving coal generators out of the market. Exacerbating that trend, the wind boom is expected to be followed by a solar boom in the Lone Star state; in its most recent long-term scenario, ERCOT said between 14,500 MW and 28,100 MW of solar capacity could be added to the system by 2031. Through September, Texas had generated about 17% of its electricity from wind in 2017. Developers have already signed interconnection agreements for another 8,655 MW of new wind, plus 2,050 MW of new solar installations, in ERCOT.For coal plant owners, low natural gas prices and high wind penetration “have been like a one-two punch,” says Chen-Hao Tsai, senior energy economist with the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas, Austin. “If solar really takes off as ERCOT predicts, that will replace a good amount of generation from conventional generators during the daytime. I would consider that the third punch.”Adding to the blows against coal, natural gas plant construction is proceeding as well: “more than 14 GW [of] gas-fired generation capacity are also in the pipeline, with 7.6 GW scheduled to come online in 2018,” according to a July 2017 report by Tsai and his colleague Gürcan Gülen for the International Association of Energy Economics.What goes for Texas today could soon apply to the U.S. as a whole. According to the American Wind Energy Association, nearly 26,000 MW of wind capacity is now in development nationwide, with more than 14,000 MW under construction. New installed wind capacity reached 2,357 MW in the first half of this year, the American Wind Energy Assocation says, pushing total installed capacity to 84,405 MW. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, electricity generation from wind will reach about 526 billion KWh by 2040, nearly 11% of total U.S. generation.The Department of Energy’s more ambitious Wind Vision program aims to boost wind to 35% of U.S. generation by 2050.In Texas, meanwhile, wind power’s position is being strengthened by new farms built not in West Texas, home to the majority of the capacity built to date, but along the Gulf Coast. While West Texas still accounts for the majority of the state’s wind capacity, wind power along the Gulf Coast has increased sixfold in the last five years, reaching 2,385 MW, or nearly 12% of the state’s total wind capacity. That’s important because Gulf winds blow more consistently than those in West Texas, and better match with the peak daytime hours for electricity consumption, overcoming the variability that of generation from farms in West Texas, where the wind is highest at night.That will likely crowd out more fossil fuel generation, especially from coal plants, which are less flexible than plants that burn natural gas and are thus less able to ramp up quickly when the sun’s not shining and the wind’s not blowing. According to a May 2016 report from the Brattle Group — also prepared for TCEC — coal generators face a sharp decline in Texas: Coal’s share of generation in the state will fall from 34% in 2013 to 6% in 2035.Coal’s dethronement in Texas has implications for coal producers in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin, as well. Texas, which consumed some 86 million tons of coal in 2015, much of it from Powder River mines, is by far the largest coal market in the U.S. Accelerating retirements in Texas will have a dramatic effect on Powder River Basin mines: Luminant’s Monticello and Big Brown plants, for instance, both of which are now slated for early retirement, bought up 54% of production from Peabody Energy’s Rawhide mine through the first seven months of 2017, according to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis.More: Wind booms, coal suffers in oversupplied Texas grid Wind Booms, Coal Suffers in Oversupplied Texas Gridlast_img read more

Australian regulators give big boost to batteries, demand response

first_imgAustralian regulators give big boost to batteries, demand response FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:Tesla and other proponents of virtual power plants and demand management schemes have scored a significant win after the country’s main energy market rule maker gave its support to the idea that they can compete freely on the wholesale electricity market.The decision announced by the Australian Energy Market Commission on Thursday is likely to encourage new players in the market to aggregate solar and battery storage installed in homes and businesses, as well as load controls, in a major shift to the way demand and supply is managed.It is also likely to encourage proponents of technologies that would manage the charging of electric vehicles, and the use of their combined battery capacity in the grid, and it could encourage peer-to-peer trading.In short, it means that customers with battery storage and electric vehicles can strike contracts with providers other than their main retailers to provide power to the grid when needed. It sets a signal that the Australian grid is finally moving to embrace 21st century technologies.That said, the AEMC – after years of deliberation and after initially rejecting the idea – has only given approval in principle. The idea still awaits a specific rule request that will likely repeat the battle between the proponents of new technologies, and those locked in the past.The decision by the AEMC in its Reliability Frameworks Review shapes up a major victory for the likes to Tesla, sonnen, Simec Zen, Reposit, Redback, Sunverge, and others who have argued for the development of “virtual power plants”. These are essentially rooftop solar and battery storage installations located “behind the meter” in homes and businesses which are connected by software. These “distributed energy resources” can be harnessed to help moderate prices and meet demand peaks.More: Win for Tesla, batteries, EVs and smart tech in Australian gridlast_img read more

Italy’s Enel says renewables powering growth in its 2018 profits

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Windpower Monthly:Renewable energy was the main driver behind Enel’s growth in operating profit, the power firm stated, and was its largest recipient of investment in the first nine months of the year.The Italian company’s reported earnings before interest, taxation, depreciation and amortisation (Ebitda) rose 6% year-on-year to €12.1 billion between 1 January and 30 September. It stated that this increase was “mainly driven by renewables”, and that – along with networks – clean energy sources contributed €670 million of earnings in this period.Enel increased its capital expenditure on renewables by 32% year-on-year, and with an investment of €2.65 billion, clean energy received more than any other business line as it did in 2017.The power company installed 3.3GW of new renewable energy capacity in the last 12 months, it stated. This total includes 613MW of new wind power capacity commissioned by its subsidiary Enel Green Power in the first nine months of 2018, including a 132MW project in Peru – the country’s largest wind farm.It also added hydro (62MW) geothermal (1MW) and ‘solar and others’ (1,112MW), but no new nuclear, coal, combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT), or oil and gas during this period.Enel’s wind fleet reached 7,438MW at the end of the third quarter: 8.75% of its 84,932MW total capacity. Hydro, coal, CCGT and oil and gas all had larger shares of this total. The Italian power company had 3,279MW of wind projects under construction (1,773MW) or ready to build (1,506MW) at end of Q3, more than any other power source.More: Clean energy ‘main driver’ of Enel’s earnings Italy’s Enel says renewables powering growth in its 2018 profitslast_img read more

Daily Dirt: Outdoor News for March 26, 2013

first_imgDelaware Finally Does ItIt’s hard not to feel bad for Delaware, especially with all the activity at the Supreme Court of equality this week. Poor little Delaware, the redheaded stepchild of America; the forgotten first state of this great nation, the disenfranchised native son, the only state in the union without a National Park Service presence…until now. On Monday, President Obama designated 1,100 acres of land between Wilmington and Philadelphia the First State National Monument, finally welcoming all 50 states into the National Park family. This will provide additional funding along with guaranteeing the land for future generations. During the same ceremony, President Obama also declared the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument on Maryland’s eastern shore, giving the mid-Atlantic a double whammy of national monuments to celebrate. So go ahead, celebrate Delaware. You deserve it.Slow news day around here so we’ll let Delaware soak up some glory.Here are some links to interesting, albiet slightly off topic, stories: The future of battery technology, and energy in general, could sprout from a lab accident. Typical. via slate.comProfile of the Man Who Changed Fly Fishing Forever, Tibor “Ted” Juracsik. via Garden and GunGeorge Lowe, final member of the first Everest Expedition dies. Not on summit team, but vital member. via OutsideStanding up for skiing, and ski bums. via SAMHurricane Sandy, rebuilding, and why we yearn to live where nature doesn’t want us. via Daily Beastlast_img read more

Trauma Tuesday: Tough Mudder Clothesline Edition

first_imgThe Tough Mudder series of races is not for the squeamish and for good reason – read about the race’s first death during competition here. The races are long and the obstacles vary from cold water plunges to wall climbs to running through wires coursing with electricity. The race is intense to say the least.It’s the Electroshock Therapy obstacle that gets the guy in the video above, and no, it’s not the guy who takes a digger at :05. You can tell the wires are working from the guy who flinches at :13 just as the true victim is sucking his doors off trying to get through without feeling the wrath. The worst part is the guy looks like he is making good time and in a healthy rhythm. Nothing like an electric clothesline to put a hitch in your giddy-up. But he’s a tough mudder, so he stayed in the game, which is commendable given he just got jacked off his feet. He’s lucky his head didn’t pop off, and you can tell he is physically hurt as well as emotionally demoralized as he slumps away.Love how the woman with the volunteer shirt just walks on by giving no assistance – if that is even a real Tough Mudder volunteer, which she may not be. Or maybe volunteers are instructed to not give assistance – that’s just another obstacle in the race. And the announcer with his two cents for the crowd: “Wow. You don’t see that every day.”No, you certainly don’t.last_img read more

Conservation Remains the Focus for Costa Sunglasses

first_imgFor one sunglass manufacturer, conservation is all about sustainable fishing; and the company works with partners around the world to help increase awareness and influence policy so that both the fish and fishermen of tomorrow will have healthy waters.More than 30 years ago, a group of anglers banded together with a goal to build the clearest, best performing sunglasses, able to withstand harsh fishing environments. Costa continues today with a mission to not only help people see what’s out there, but to protect sustainable sport fishing at the same time.In 2011, Costa began its partnership with music star Kenny Chesney to design a signature line of sunglasses with proceeds from the sale of each pair benefiting habitat restoration programs with the Coastal Conservation Association (CCA). The program has raised more than $80,000 since it began.Costa also recently worked with its partner, Bonefish & Tarpon Trust (BTT), to develop and support Project Permit — a five-year tagging program designed to collect never-before-seen data on permit fish in Florida and the Caribbean. Since its inception, Project Permit has expanded into Mexico. The program is starting to see an increase in tag returns, which will help provide important research to inform future fishery policies and regulations.Costa-Project-Permit-2In 2012, Costa helped open the first sport fishing tourism program in Guyana, a first of its kind in the country. As seen in the award-winning film, Jungle Fish, the Rewa village on the Rupununi River now has the capacity to bring fly anglers in to fish for monster arapaima, creating jobs and generating sustainable economic development for the region. Since opening, the sport fishing lodge has remained at capacity, hosting up to 24 fly fishing anglers per year. Recently, the program won a $500,000 grant from Compete Caribbean, with the goal to expand the sport fishing tourism efforts to several other villages in Guyana. Exploratory efforts are taking place to learn how this sustainable sport fishing program can be introduced to other parts of the world.Currently, as a support partner to OCEARCH — a shark tagging research program aiming to replace fear with facts — Costa helps develop and collect all of the multimedia content from each expedition. The content is then shared online allowing educators, scientists and shark enthusiasts alike to take part in important conversations about one of the planet’s top predators. In 2014, OCEARCH is on a mission to South America, visiting the Galapagos Islands, Chile, and Brazil to expand its tagging efforts to include yellow fin tuna, wahoo, rainbow runner, skip jack, White sharks and Tiger, Hammerhead, Bull, Blacktip and Silky sharks, among other species.An important part of Trout Unlimited’s (TU) expanding Youth Education efforts, the “5 Rivers” program organizes campus groups to provide students an opportunity to learn fly casting and fly tying and also to participate in off-campus volunteer activities on the members’ home waters. Costa worked with TU to develop the program, which now boasts chapters at 26 colleges and universities.For the past five years Costa has hosted a now-legendary “party with a purpose” on the University of Alabama campus in Tuscaloosa. Instead of marketing at other people’s events, Costa decided to control the vibe. The event brings national acts to a music festival to raise money for sport fishing programs. Since the event began, thousands of University of Alabama students have helped raise more than $200,000 for groups including The Billfish Foundation and Coastal Conservation Association. Costa also works to support the Center for Coastal Conservation and the Turneffe Atoll Trust to protect the Belize fishery.“In order for the sport fishing industry to continue to grow, we must work together to protect the resources and attract new people into the sport,” said Costa president Chas MacDonald. “Without the fish, there are no anglers. Protect the fish, and they will keep the anglers participating in the sport and growing the business opportunities.”Costa-Project-Permitlast_img read more

My Top 10 Festival Essentials

first_imgFestival season has finally arrived.In June I saw The Wood Brothers at Mountain Music Festival in the New River Gorge. This month so far I was able to see Pokey LaFarge, Trampled By Turtles, The Devil Makes Three, and a host of other amazing artists at this past weekend’s Red Wing Roots Festival. While I don’t necessarily consider myself a diehard festival-goer like a Deadhead or anything, I’m not above waiting a couple hours before a show to make sure I’m front and center for my favorite artists’ performance.That’s why it’s important to me to be prepared.I know. It sounds silly. Prepare for what? Awesome music blasting my face off? What am I, a Boy Scout?But seriously, a little preparation can go a long way when you’ve found yourself stranded at a festival for 5 days with a slimming wallet, a wet sleeping bag, dirty feet, and a classic case of dehydration.With Floyd Fest right around the corner, I’m already in fan-girl-plan mode, strategically considering the weather, my tolerance for dirt, and which days I’m going to need to stay up late to catch the headliner. The following 10 items I’ve determined are my festival-must-haves, the essentials that keep the vibe groovy, help me stay sane, and don’t drain my bank account.festival_essentials1) Deuter Futura 20At 20L, this do-anything pack is perfect for festivals. Say the weather looks questionable and I’m getting ready to post up in front of the stage for the next two hours to be an arm’s-length away from Ray Lamontagne during his Floyd Fest set (which, will likely be happening). I need enough space in a pack to cram a rain shell, a hydration reservoir, my camera, and some snacks. What’s more, I need that space without the pack being stuffed-to-the-brim or too-bulky-to-rage.I like to dance my hiney off at concerts. We all know what it’s like to be behind “that guy/girl” who gets too wasted too early in the day and needs a buffer zone for their flailing limbs. Now imagine how much more obnoxious that scenario would be with a giant pack waving around too. While live music, and not so much the alcohol, is what typically sets me a-scootin’, I’m what you might call an “expressive dancer.” Picture Elaine from Seinfeld with just a touch more grace. A pack with a streamlined design and a roomy interior isn’t just convenient for me: it’s a necessity.2) Freewaters SierraGood, durable, comfortable flops are a must. If you’re not used to standing all day at your job, then 3-5 days of non-stop standing, dancing, walking…it’s bound to get exhausting and probably painful for either your feet or your lower back. Check out these flip flops from Freewaters, which feature a footbed designed by Therm-a-Rest. These babies not only look good; they feel good, support your arches, and keep your feet cool.3) IceMule Pro Cooler 20LLet’s face it – eating every meal from the festival food vendors not only gets boring but gets freakin’ PRICEY. I don’t have $9 to spend on a burrito I can inhale and still feel hungry. Sorry. My solution? Pack everything I normally eat – eggs, veggies, almond milk, etc. – and throw it in my IceMule. A friend of mine started putting a small chunk of dry ice (available at many grocery stores) in his cooler which is a genius idea that I’d wish I’d thought of. It almost works too well and generally keeps things pretty solidly frozen for at least three days, but a 10lb bag of ice works just as well for keeping perishables cold.This soft-shell cooler is better than its hard-top cousin because a) it has backpack straps, b) it fits into packed cars better, and c) it doesn’t have crappy plastic handles that break right when you need them most.4) Eddie Bauer Adventurer Convertible ShirtSunburn puts a wrap on anybody’s day, especially when it’s a bad one. A sunburn early on in your festival experience will only get worse and will likely cause you to, dare I say it, LEAVE BEFORE THE SHOW’S OVER. For shame. Don’t pretend you’re tanner than you are, or that you “just need to get that base burn.” There’s no such thing. Trust me. I’m a ginger. Own your pasty skin and invest in some sun coverage (these days, sunscreen is just as likely to give you cancer as sun rays are, right?). This lightweight shirt from Eddie Bauer (I have the silver color) is great for long days out in the sun. I wear it equally as much on the river paddling as I do in town grabbing a drink with friends. It dries quickly and saves your skin with built-in FreeShade™ UPF 50+ sun protection. Whether it’s blazing hot or kinda stormy, this shirt will keep you cool and comfortable all day.5) Road ShowerThe days of baby wipes are over! I never thought a product like Road Shower existed but now, it’s hard to imagine what my life was like without it. Perfect for posting up at festivals for a few days of car camping, this 5-gallon, hard-shell reservoir is painted matte black which lets the water inside get warm from the sun’s rays. A bike pump attachment at the end lets you pressurize your shower, so at the end of the day you can rinse the sweaty grime off and give your muddy feet some love.6) CamelBak Chute 1LSometimes, I don’t want to lug around an entire hydration reservoir filled to max-capacity. That’s a lot of weight, and what if I drink all that water and then have to pee in the middle of the Carolina Chocolate Drops set? That doesn’t sound very fun. Instead, I try to drink one of these at a time. The small mouth opening also helps me get more water where it belongs and not down the front of my shirt.7) Little Sugar Naturals Lemony CricketI stopped using DEET products years ago, but I’ve gotta admit, it’s been hard to find an effective all-natural alternative. That’s why when I stumbled across Little Sugar Naturals’ products at the Charlottesville City Market a few weeks ago, I was a little suspicious at first. Coconut, citronella, lavender, lemongrass…this sounds more like my mom’s perfume. I bought it anyway and at $15, it’s probably been my best investment yet. Even at the buggiest of campgrounds, I always walk away unscathed. What’s more? It smells way better than traditional bug sprays, and I’ve actually replaced it as my lotion for the summertime because of its coconut oil base.8) ENO TwilightsGreat for when you’re hanging around camp and you don’t want to waste your headlamp’s batteries (or continually annoy people by blinding them every time you look their way). These lights look cool, hang anywhere, pack down small, and run an unbelievably long time off only three AAA batteries (I’ve put well over 30 hours on the current set and they’re still going strong).9) Alite Mantis ChairFor when you need to give your dogs a rest, check out this super compact and portable chair option. The frame, made from lightweight aluminum, breaks down much like a tent pole does and is easy to set up. The entire chair can fit easily into your pack, making it awesome for when you want to take a break in between sets.10) Threshold Provisions BarA Blue Ridge-made alternative to other energy bars, Threshold Provisions makes some seriously tasty bars out of their base in Asheville, N.C. A non-GMO bar that has no added sugar and is gluten-, dairy-, and soy-free, these things are only made with a handful of ingredients but pack upwards of 230 calories per bar. At festivals, it’s especially hard for me to get motivated to eat breakfast in the morning, but a cup of coffee and the Mango Mate bar is enough to get me amped for the day ahead.last_img read more

Mountain Mama: Kayakers Were My Weakness

first_img“I want to do fun things with him,” one twenty-something woman said to another as I sat behind them in the neighborhood cafe, eavesdropping. “I want to have fun together.”Her friend leaned over the stack of nursing books between them to ask, “Where is he today?”“Kayaking.”“Don’t worry, it’ll be different when you’re married – then you’ll be really together.” She gave her friend a half-hug, but the about-to-be-married-to-a-kayaker woman shook her head.“I hope so. He used to take me rafting. We used to go on long walks near the river.”I wanted to interject, to tell her how I’d been seduced by that dangerous thinking. Five years ago I met an extreme kayaker who chased the seasons instead of a salary. Skinny-dipping and swapping life stories under the full moon, life seemed perfect as weeks passed on the river and in his arms. Smitten by his quiet confidence, I ditched my own plans and followed him to Southern Appalachia to see if the life I’d dreamed of living near the river was actually possible.I invented a story, extrapolating our future life together based on that magical month. I imagined us traveling to South America together, him to instruct kayaking, while I’d work on my boof and hone my writing, inspired by the adventures we’d no doubt have. I dreamt of the sweet cabin in the mountains that we’d return to and decorate with art we purchased during our travels. He’d loop me into his adventurous lifestyle and expand my horizons.The woman confided to her friend how worried she was about her fiancé’s job prospects, how she couldn’t afford to support him and put herself through nursing school, and how she wanted to stop mothering him and instead have fun with him. But I didn’t say anything that afternoon in the cafe, figuring if she was anything like me, someone else’s words wouldn’t make a difference.I had this thing about kayakers. Kayakers tend to be passionate, intense, and exciting and when they’re around, their personalities can be intoxicating. I saw myself in that worried nursing student – like me, she was a responsible professional and prioritizing the “right” things over the fun thing. And I worried for her, that in marrying a kayaker she might make the same mistakes I had made, that she would hope and wish for the attention of a man, waiting for him to take her to do the things she wanted instead of doing them herself, to expect that her partner would somehow turn her into the person she wanted to become instead of doing the work herself.I thought back to a friend who attempted to intervene on my kayaker obsession. During a heart-to-heart after a bottle of wine she stared me in the eye and said, “You don’t need to date a Class V paddler. You’re already Class V.”I disagreed, I didn’t paddle Class V. Or if I did, it was an easy Class V rapid that another paddler coached me down. No, I wasn’t a Class V boater nor did I have the guts or determination to become one.I spent over a year yoking my aspirations to the path of that extreme kayaker. The more I expected of him, the more he retreated to the river. When he finally left, it sunk in that dating a kayaker and being a kayaker was not the same thing.Somewhere along the way I forgot me. I love to travel. I love to run and practice yoga. I love paddling too, big splashy waves, without a lot of consequences. I love to hole up in cafes and write. I love pedicures and sharing deep conversations over bottles of wine. I had this dream of buying a sailboat and island hopping. I started to realize that living in the shadows of the extreme kayaker made me forget about who I wanted to be, about who I already was.I saw with the clarity that time lends what my friend meant when she said I didn’t need to date a Class V boater. She was trying to tell me that I could live the authentic, righteous life I associated with that label, that I was already a pretty cool person, me, all by myself, without a man at all. Somewhere along the way I’d forgotten that.I started to inhabit my own passions and dreams until an extraordinary thing happened. I realized I no longer relied on anyone else for my identity. The more I focused on my life and interests, the more I really enjoyed being me. I had become enough, more than enough, fully engaged in my life.For the first time in a decade, I wasn’t crushing on, dating, or recovering from dating a kayaker. I went paddling after that day in the café and realized how much I still love being on the water. Moving with it and being near it energizes me and I wondered if perhaps I confused my love for rivers with loving kayakers. I thought about the nursing student as I paddled, hoping that she would go out and have fun on her own terms, whether or not her fiancé joined her. I hoped so.I still believe in the fairy tale, for me and for that nursing student. But I’ve rewritten my version of it so that prince charming doesn’t have to wear a skirt, obsess over kayak porn, or disappear when it rains.last_img read more

Summer Gear and Adventure Giveaway

first_imgThis contest is complete.Rules and Regulations: Package must be redeemed within 1 year of winning date. Entries must be received by mail or through the www.blueridgeoutdoors.com contest sign-up page by 12:00 Midnight EST on August 1st, 2015. One entry per person. One winner per household. Sweepstakes open only to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United States and the District of Columbia, who are 18 years of age or older. Void wherever prohibited by law. Families and employees of Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors are not eligible. No liability is assumed for lost, late, incomplete, inaccurate, non-delivered or misdirected mail, or misdirected e-mail, garbled, mistranscribed, faulty or incomplete telephone transmissions, for technical hardware or software failures of any kind, lost or unavailable network connection, or failed, incomplete or delayed computer transmission or any human error which may occur in the receipt of processing of the entries in this Sweepstakes. By entering the sweepstakes, entrants agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and their promotional partners reserve the right to contact entrants multiple times with special information and offers. Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine reserves the right, at their sole discretion, to disqualify any individual who tampers with the entry process and to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the Sweepstakes. Winners agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors, their subsidiaries, affiliates, agents and promotion agencies shall not be liable for injuries or losses of any kind resulting from acceptance of or use of prizes. No substitutions or redemption of cash, or transfer of prize permitted. Any taxes associated with winning any of the prizes detailed below will be paid by the winner. Winners agree to allow sponsors to use their name and pictures for purposes of promotion. Sponsors reserve the right to substitute a prize of equal or greater value. All Federal, State and local laws and regulations apply. Selection of winner will be chosen at random at the Blue Ridge Outdoors office on or before August 1st, 6:00 PM EST 2015. Winners will be contacted by the information they provided in the contest sign-up field and have 7 days to claim their prize before another winner will be picked. Odds of winning will be determined by the total number of eligible entries received.last_img read more