Mayor accused of ethics breach

first_imgThe city Ethics Commission filed a 31-count accusation Tuesday against the 2003 City Council campaign of now-Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. In a six-page declaration, the commission said Villaraigosa’s primary election campaign received four contributions in excess of the $500 limit and exceeded the total amount allowed to be given by corporations. The Ethics Commission also said the campaign failed to follow city laws in disclosing the contents of 23 mailers and failing to provide a copy of a campaign script. Villaraigosa attorney Stephen Kaufman said the campaign mistakenly failed to return the individual contributions and provide the campaign literature. But Kaufman said he will contest the accusation regarding corporation contributions. Kaufman said that money was raised after the election and used for Villaraigosa’s officeholder account as a councilman. The 2003 race marked Villaraigosa’s first election to city office after his defeat by James Hahn in the 2001 race for mayor. Villaraigosa defeated incumbent Councilman Nick Pacheco in the 2003 race and used his council office to run for mayor in 2005. Ethics Commission staff said they could not comment on the accusations until the issue is heard by the city Ethics Commission. Commission staff said individual contributions in excess of the $500 limit were from: Bruce Coring and his Metropolitan Theatres Good Government Committee, which gave a total of $750; attorney Alan Rothenberg, who gave a total of $750; Daisy Ma, who gave $800; and United Crane Services, which gave $1,000. [email protected] (213) 978-0390160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

3D nanotube assembly technique for nanoscale electronics

first_img From 2-D to 1-D: atomically quasi ‘1-D’ wires using a carbon nanotube template (PhysOrg.com) — For the past several years, researchers have been trying to take advantage of carbon nanotubes’ good electrical properties for future nanoscale electronics applications. One of the biggest challenges in this area is finding ways to arrange and assemble the nanotubes into 3D configurations for carrying current in nanoscale devices. Most recently, a team of physicists and engineers from the Electronic Materials Research Institute at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, has demonstrated a technique for assembling nanotubes using an applied electric field. Using this method, the researchers could assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes into 3D structures by coaxing the nanotubes into deep nanoholes in a porous alumina template. An average of one nanotube per hole was vertically assembled, and, by sweeping the 0.32cm2 area, more than one million holes were filled with nanotubes.“The greatest significance of this technique is that it provides the potential to manufacture, at a high rate and on a large scale, three-dimensional single-wall carbon nanotube electrical interconnects, without the need for high-temperature synthesis,” Srinivas Sridhar, Director of the Electronic Materials Research Institute, told PhysOrg.com.To achieve this nanotube assembly, the researchers attached a positive electrode to the bottom of a silicon template, which the aluminum template went on top of. Then they manually swept a negative electrode over assembly sites, pushing negatively charged nanotubes into the holes in the aluminum template. This process of using an electric field to move charged objects is called electrophoresis. Similarly, a process called dielectrophoresis, in which a non-uniform electric field moves charged or uncharged objects, also assisted in orienting the nanotubes toward the holes.After assembling the nanotubes, the researchers sputtered a 15-nm-thick gold layer on top of the alumina template, touching the tops of the nanotubes. This layer completed an electrical connection between all the nanotubes reaching the surface of the template, with electric current traveling through the nanotubes between the gold and silicon layers. On control samples without nanotubes, no current was observed between the two layers, confirming that the nanotubes had carried the current.By not requiring high temperatures, and providing the ability to cover centimeter-scale areas in a short time, the new assembly technique has useful advantages over other nanotube assembly techniques. The method could also integrate well into existing silicon platforms, which could be used in microelectronics, field emission displays, electronic memory devices and solar cells.“The next step in nanoscale electronics is to integrate the 3D carbon nanotubes architectures with current CMOS technology and create hybrid systems,” Sridhar said. “The holy grail of nanoscale electronics is to completely replace CMOS technology by monolithic carbon nanotubes devices.“Scaling down the nominal feature size makes more space available on a chip to hold more transistors and other types of devices,” he added. “Shrinking process geometries means better performance and lower costs.”More information: Electronic Materials Research InstituteCitation: Gultepe, Evin; Nagesha, Dattatri; Casse, Bernard Didier Frederic; Selvarasah, Selvapraba; Busnaina, Ahmed; and Sridhar, Srinivas. “Large scale 3D vertical assembly of single-wall carbon nanotubes at ambient temperatures.” Nanotechnology 19 (2008) 455309 (5pp). Contact: s.sridhar(at)neu.eduCopyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further Citation: 3D nanotube assembly technique for nanoscale electronics (2008, October 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-10-3d-nanotube-technique-nanoscale-electronics.html A cross-sectional view of the assembled carbon nanotubes and gold top layer in yellow (false color), taken by a scanning electron microscope. Image credit : Evin Gultepe, et al. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

See the world

first_imgSandhu’s landscapes in oils, water colours and pastels along with Amar’s adventure travel  photography from across the world will be displayed for the first time in India.Sandhu is one of the few artists who have developed prints using her iPad drawing apps and translates nature, still life into colorful paintings in mixed media, using ink, water colour, acrylics and oils. Singh, also a mountianeer,  loves to record his myriad adventures with his camera. The idea behind this exhibition was to show a collection by Sandhu, landscapes that have inspired her along with her son’s photos of his adventures and his love for the outdoors.Singh has organised expeditions to remote and interesting parts of the world such as Kamchatka, the Himalayas, Madagascar, Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia, Japan, the Swiss Alps and the Australian Outback.When: 12-14 April; Timing: 11.30 am-7.30 pmWhere: Visual Art Gallery, Indian Habitat Centrelast_img read more