Pets of the Week at the Pasadena Humane Society

first_img More Cool Stuff Herbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNerdy Movie Kids Who Look Unrecognizable TodayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTop Important Things You Never Knew About MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeauty Business News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News Pets of the Week at the Pasadena Humane Society From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 | 4:53 pm Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Top of the News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Here are the Pets of the Week available for adoption at the Pasadena Humane Society this week:Jimmy (A449213) is a lovable Chihuahua mix who wants nothing more than to be by your side. This 5-year-old boy loves to sit in laps and is quite the snuggler. Jimmy also has an active side and enjoys going for walks in the park. He’s looking for a warm new home with lots of tasty dog treats. At five years old, Jimmy qualifies for our Seniors for Seniors program, so his adoption fee is free for adopters age 60 and up.The adoption fee for dogs is $130. All dogs are spayed or neutered, microchipped, and vaccinated before going to their new home. At five years old, Jimmy qualifies for our Seniors for Seniors program, so his adoption fee is free for adopters age 60 and up.New adopters will receive a complimentary health-and-wellness exam from VCA Animal Hospitals, as well as a goody bag filled with information about how to care for your pet.Call the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA at (626) 792-7151 to ask about A449213 or visit at 361 S. Raymond Ave. in Pasadena. Adoption hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.Pets may not be available for adoption and cannot be held for potential adopters by phone calls or email. Directions and photos of all pets can be found at pasadenahumane.org. Pearl (A412934) is a 10-year-old, spayed female, shorthair tabby that came to PHS when her owner could no longer care for her. She has quickly become a staff favorite at the shelter. And it’s easy to see why! This older gal is very communicative, meowing happily to let you know what’s on her mind. Pearl is very affectionate and loves head rubs and petting. For as long as you pet her, she’ll purr and meow to show her pleasure. You’ll find Pearl at our offsite adoption center located at Pet Food Express in Pasadena.The adoption fee for cats is $75. All cats are spayed or neutered, microchipped, and vaccinated before being adopted. Pearl qualifies for our Seniors for Seniors program, so her adoption fee is free for adopters age 60 and up.New adopters will receive a complimentary health-and-wellness exam from VCA Animal Hospitals, as well as a goody bag filled with information about how to care for your pet.Call the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA at (626) 792-7151 to ask about A412934, or visit at 361 S. Raymond Ave. in Pasadena. Adoption hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.Pets may not be available for adoption and cannot be held for potential adopters by phone calls or email. Directions and photos of all pets can be found at pasadenahumane.org. 3 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribe Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

City to Hold Study Session on CEQA Transportation Analysis

first_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. HerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuff Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Government City to Hold Study Session on CEQA Transportation Analysis Session follows November updates to Vehicle Miles Traveled STAFF REPORT Published on Tuesday, January 19, 2021 | 11:57 am CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Business News 15 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribe Make a comment Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes The city’s Transportation Department will conduct a Transportation Advisory Commission (TAC) Study Session on Jan. 28 to enhance understanding of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Transportation Analysis and the city’s local mobility analysis.The study session begins at 4 p.m.The workshop follows City Council action on Nov. 16 updating the CEQA baseline and adopting updated Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) and Vehicle Trips (VT) transportation impact analysis thresholds.“Recognized as one of the early VMT adopters, the city is continuing to take proactive steps that further promote sustainable transportation and align with the state’s commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and achieving long?term climate change goals,” the city said in a statement.VMT refers to the number of miles traveled by automobiles, no matter how many passengers it is carrying, in relation to development projects.These actions comply with Senate Bill 743, signed into law in 2013. The bill updated the standard by which a development’s impacts on transportation are evaluated under CEQA.Prior to SB 743, impacts were evaluated by the Level of Service, (LOS) which evaluated how projects would affect traffic on local roadways.Projects that could alleviate or divert traffic from congested areas received a higher LOS score.SB 743 replaced Level of Service with Vehicle Miles Traveled. VMT takes into account the number of vehicles on the road and the miles they’re driving.Projects that reduce or have little impact on VMT receive better ratings.For more information, contact Alejandra Flores (626) 744-4031. Top of the News last_img read more

Daryl Gross discusses change in role, NCAA report on ESPN Radio

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments Outgoing Syracuse Director of Athletics Daryl Gross was extremely positive while discussing the past and future of Syracuse Athletics in an ESPN Syracuse Radio interview on Wednesday afternoon.Earlier Wednesday, an email from Syracuse Chancellor Kent Syverud confirmed that Gross will no longer be the university’s director of athletics, but will stay with the university as vice president and special assistant to the chancellor and adjunct professor in the David B. Falk School School of Sport and Human Dynamics.“Well, I tell you, first of all, I am so grateful for the opportunity Chancellor Syverud offered me to be a vice president at this great university and be a special assistant to the chancellor,” Gross began in the radio interview. “He and I have worked so well together and we’ve talked about being together for a while and I really respect him and the things that he’s done and his vision and the institution is in terrific shape.”After continuing on about his excitement and gratitude for what lies ahead, Gross was asked about the NCAA’s 94-page report released 12 days ago. He added later in the interview that hindsight is 20-20, and he wouldn’t pinpoint any specifics of what he’d change if he could go back into his 10-year tenure.Here’s Gross’ full response to the release and aftermath of the NCAA report:AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I don’t want to spend a lot of time on the report… we are still really good about a lot of processes that we did take. Everyone had the best interest, things were discussed as groups, things were discussed in a transparent way in the institution and sometimes the perception of what’s been written is not accurate. That’s just part of the deal, they just write stuff and the truth will come out. I don’t even worry about it, I don’t even worry about comments because people just don’t have enough data to say some of the things they’re saying. It’s just not accurate and I don’t even want to get into specific areas, but there is an area where we truly were trying to do the right thing. It was even stated and folks came to miss it in the report, that certain meetings were appropriate and the right thing to do. Not to ignore, but to get expertise and those type of things. I don’t want to get into any of those kind of details but I feel good about it, about the fact that everyday we went to work, we went there in trying to do the right thing and trying to make the right decision and trying to do it with as many people in the conversation as possible. I think that’s something you should try to do in life so that’s my feeling on it.”center_img Published on March 18, 2015 at 3:07 pm Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jesselast_img read more

Liverpool to smash transfer record for target, Spurs keeper on Man City’s radar

first_img1 Transfer rumours and paper review Here are the top football stories in Saturday’s newspapers…Liverpool are ready to smash the club’s transfer record to sign Jurgen Klopp’s prime target Naby Keita. The midfield player starred for RB Leipzig last season, and the Reds are reportedly willing to pay the £50m requested for him. (The Mirror)Manchester United have opened talks with Paris Saint-Germain as they plot a move for Brazil international Lucas Moura. Moura, 24, was close to signing for the Old Trafford club in 2012 before PSG offered more money, and Jose Mourinho is now keen despite the Ligue 1 side wanting to recoup much of the £40m fee they paid for him. (The Sun)Watford are closing in on appointing Marco Silva as head coach following his departure from Hull City. The Portuguese boss was the Hornets’ number one managerial target, and a deal is close to being finalised. (The Guardian)Tottenham goalkeeper Hugo Lloris is on Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City wishlist. Bernardo Silva became City’s first summer signing on Friday, as Guardiola kickstarted his £200m recruitment drive, with deals for Alexis Sanchez, Kyle Walker and Silva’s former Monaco teammate Benjamin Mendy also on the cards. (The Mirror)Antonio Conte is set to sign a new contract with Chelsea until the summer of 2021. The Premier League-winning boss will be earning £9.6m-a-year following his success in 2016/17. (The Mirror)Claudio Ranieri could return to football for next season as Leeds United consider appointing the Premier League-winning manager as Garry Monk’s replacement. Monk resigned on Thursday, and owner Andrea Radrizzani is keen on his fellow countryman. (The Sun)And here are the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…?Wayne Rooney should not leave for China as he still has ‘so much to offer’, according to former Manchester United midfielder Ray Wilkins West Ham United and Southampton are interested in signing Juventus midfielder Kwadwo Asamoah, according to reports ItalyBorussia Dortmund are ready to trigger the £21m release clause of Arsenal, Chelsea and Tottenham target Patrik SchickLiverpool have received a boost in their pursuit of Hull full-back Andrew Robertson, according to reports in PortugalFormer Everton loan flop Lacina Traore has revealed he ‘dreams of returning to England’ – and could get the chance this summerDerek McInnes is refusing to allow speculation over his future distract from Aberdeen’s bid for Scottish Cup glorylast_img read more

Lazy Darwinists Abuse Science

first_imgThe Darwin storytelling empire has become fat and lazy, abandoning the hard work of empiricism for tantalizing speculations. Time for a reformation.Sir Francis Bacon in the 16th century, using ideas reminiscent of those of his earlier namesake Roger Bacon, worked to reform science away from authority and toward empiricism. Fed up with scholasticism that interpreted everything through the filter of ancient sages (particularly Aristotle), Francis Bacon argued that scientific pronouncements must pass the test of repeatable observation and experiment. Today’s Darwinians are like medieval scholastics, interpreting the world through their favorite sage—Darwin. Look at the nonsense that results:Could it be that religion is more like sex than school? (Peter Kevern in The Conversation). Here’s another entry in the genre, “the evolution of religion.” Ironically, Kevern acknowledges that many previous entries in this genre incur charges of just-so storytelling. Yet he fails to see that his own account is just as guilty. [Note: his article prompted an interchange with the Editor of Creation-Evolution Headlines; follow the Comments at the end of the article.]New York City mice may be evolving to eat fast food like pizza (New Scientist). Are you evolving every time you develop a taste for a new food? NS storyteller Chris Baraniuk seems to think so. This one gets downright silly:The survey also highlighted genes linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which may result from having to process a lot of fatty acids. This could be due to a diet rich in fast foods. “The first thing that we thought of was the ‘cheeseburger hypothesis’: urban mice subsidising their diet on human food waste,” says Harris. If so, the mice may be like “Pizza Rat”, a New York rodent videoed carrying a whole slice of pizza.Single-nucleotide polymorphisms observed in the rats do not necessarily have anything to do with taste for pizza. They just “could” have, according to the storytellers, even though they know that rats, like people and roaches and goats, will eat just about anything. Hopi Hoekstra, who has achieved the coveted Darwinian title of Miss Information, liked the story, even though the necessary empirical work is, she admits, futureware:The next step will be to examine the function of these genes more closely to assess their impact on fitness and selection, says Hopi Hoekstra at Harvard University.Hoekstra says the work is part of a wave of studies investigating examples of rapid adaptation. “That provides us with a really cool way to study evolutionary change, sort of as it’s happening,” she says.Exploding stars could have kick-started our ancestors’ evolution (New Scientist). Anything “could have” happened in the world of imagination. Colin Barras imagines that an unobserved supernova caused increased lightning, which burned the forests in Africa, forcing our ape-like ancestors out of the trees and into the savannahs, where they learned to walk upright (but see 9/21/17 and 7/08/12). What evidence does he provide? In the tradition of scholasticism, Barras points to authorities in Germany who have put forth a “possible explanation” for the non-empirical just-so story, relying on highly indirect clues and millions of Darwin Years.Ankle fossil suggests our ancient ancestors leapt like acrobats (New Scientist). Unrepentant of his storytelling, Colin Barras tells another whopper here. He uses a single bone like a divination tool to claim that a “primate ancestor” found in France “might actually have been a bizarre monkey-like animal capable of acrobatic leaping.” Anything “might” be possible. So what does this have to do with us? Not much:If primates did begin as leapers, it will be harder to work out what drove their initial evolution, says Boyer. “It’s easy to understand how specialisation for navigating small branches would be beneficial, specifically for harvesting food objects that grow there. It’s hard to think of a simple scenario that would emphasise acrobatic leaping on its own.”The storytelling doesn’t stop there. Barras ends with more maybe-baby language and circular reasoning:While apatemyids are not directly related to primates, says Boyer, their similarities to the earliest primates may provide important clues about how our distant ancestors lived.First research to suggest scratching may have evolved as a communication tool to help social cohesion (Phys.org). Just because a just-so story is told for the first time does not make it any less than a just-so story. If research can only “suggest” that scratching evolved for communication, it’s not empirical. The evolutionists did not watch it evolve. Instead, they employed imagination, as seen in the high perhapsimaybecouldness index of their statement:Jamie said: “Observable stress behaviours could have evolved as a way of reducing aggression in socially complex species of primates. Showing others you are stressed could benefit both the scratcher and those watching, because both parties can then avoid conflict.”This tale is not only mythical, it’s Lamarckian. The storytellers cannot point to any mutation that was naturally selected. Observing the behavior of living macaques says nothing about how the behavior “evolved” in the first place. They almost make it sound like the monkeys thought this over: if we scratch, we’ll be nicer to each other. Did the storytellers question whether this might make them more exposed to predators? Did they think to ask if scratching “could” also provoke conflict, if the scratching were aggressive or unwelcome? Did they evaluate all the sources of conflict that might override the benefits of scratching? No; they just imagined a scenario and told their little tale to a lazy reporter who failed to ask any of these questions.The Darwin empire has become a corrupt, lazy, fat story-generating machine. You’re either going to be part of the problem or part of the Reformation. (Visited 511 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more